juice


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juice

1. n. liquor; wine. Let’s go get some juice and get stewed.
2. in. to drink heavily. Both of them were really juicing.
3. n. electricity. Turn on the juice, and let’s see if it runs.
4. n. energy; power; political influence. Dave left the president’s staff because he just didn’t have the juice anymore to be useful.
5. n. orange juice futures market. (Securities markets. Usually with the.) The juice opened a little high today, but fell quickly under profit taking.
6. n. anabolic steroids. Fred used too much juice and is growing witch tits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although 100 percent orange juice may be high in sugar, those sugars are natural and not added sweeteners, Petrucci says.
Local mangosteen juice sellers, further down the commission chain, aren't as modest.
The sodas come in 10 flavors, which taste like fresh fruit juice with light carbonation.
If you don't have juice, just slice leftover citrus, such as pink grapefruit, oranges, or tangerines, into a bowl, and proceed as described above.
Juice picks are 100% juice, with no high-fructose corn syrup or artificial sweeteners.
With a 20% rise in consumption forecast by 2004, the United Kingdom market for fruit and vegetable juices represents a good export opportunity for developing countries.
The 2005-2014 Outlook for the Juice Market in Russia contains the essential data, necessary to comprehend the current market opportunities and conditions and to assess the future prospects, covering such points as:
In the Finnish study, 50 young women who had previously been treated for a urinary tract infection were given about four tablespoons of a mixture of cranberry and lingonberry juice concentrate every day (lingonberries, which are in the cranberry family, are popular in Scandinavia).
Or, for real south-of-the-border flavor, use the juice of 2 small Key limes in place of Persian lime juice.
Many "fruit drinks" reveal on their labels that they actually contain 10 percent or less real juice.
It has been blended with everything from tart lime juice to sugary strawberry concentrate, and even clam juice and horseradish just to get it down our gullets.
A research team in Canada has just shown that drinking several glasses of orange juice dally can pump up blood concentrations of the so-called good cholesterol.
In a simple world, fruit or vegetable juice would be just that--nutritious juice squeezed from fruits or vegetables.
By far and away the dominant juice world-wide is orange but other juices, like apple, grape, pineapple and other citrus juices, are sizable markets in themselves.