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activist judge

A judge or justice (particularly of the US Supreme Court) who rules in accordance with his or her personal ideology rather than with how the law is strictly written; often used in a derogatory or pejorative sense. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Many attributed the strict environmental rulings to the activist judge who was appointed last November and is known for his love of nature.
See also: activist, judge

(some score) from the East German judge

An imaginary and exaggeratedly low score for some event, action, statement, or attempt deemed to be a failure or inadequate in some way. It is a reference to judges from the former country of East Germany, who were often seen as giving unfairly low scores to competitors from other countries during international sporting events. I'd say that pitiful retort would only get you 2 out of 10 from the East German judges, my friend.
See also: east, german, judge

you be the judge of that

You decide the worth, value, accuracy, etc. of something. Mother: "Did the kids finish their chores?" Father: "You be the judge of that." I think this cake tastes good, but you be the judge of that.
See also: judge, of

don't judge a book by its cover

Don't base your opinion of something (or someone) on the way it (or one) looks. This report may look dull, but don't judge a book by its cover—I will have you riveted by the facts and figures in no time! I know she's a little frumpy, but don't judge a book by its cover, man!
See also: book, cover, judge

no one should be judge in his own cause

A phrase that aims to preserve impartiality, as a judge would likely be swayed or otherwise affected if he or she were intimately involved in the issue at hand. It is a translation of the Latin legal maxim nemo debet esse iudex in propria causa. A: "My lawyers are seeking a mistrial in an attempt to get a different judge—one with no ties to my former company." B: "That's a good idea. No one should be judge in his own cause."
See also: cause, judge, one, should

judge between (someone or something and someone or something else)

to decide between people or things, in any combination. You can't expect me to judge between apples and oranges, can you? Can you judge between the prosecution and the defense?
See also: judge

Judge not, lest ye be judged.

 and Judge not, that ye be not judged.
Prov. If you condemn other people, then they will have the right to condemn you, so it is best not to condemn them. (Biblical.) Jill: I'm sure Gloria is the one who's been stealing from petty cash. She's so sloppy, nasty, and ill-mannered. Don't you think she'd be capable of theft? Jane: Judge not, lest ye be judged.
See also: judge, ye

judge one on one's own merits

to evaluate one on one's own good and bad points and no one else's. Please judge Janet on her own merits. I was judged on my own merits.
See also: judge, merit, on, one

judge something on its own merits

to evaluate something on its own good and bad points and nothing else. You must judge this proposal on its own merits. The proposal has not been judged on its own merits.
See also: judge, merit, on

judging by something

 and judging from something
to make a decision or judgment based on something. Judging by the amount of food eaten, everyone must have been very hungry. Judging from the mess that's left, the party must have been a good one.
See also: judge

*sober as a judge

 
1. Cliché very formal, somber, or stuffy. (*Also: as ~.) You certainly look gloomy, Bill. You're sober as a judge. Tom's as sober as a judge. I think he's angry.
2. Cliché not drunk; alert and completely sober. (*Also: as ~.) John's drunk? No, he's as sober as a judge. You should be sober as a judge when you drive a car.
See also: judge, sober

not judge a book by its cover

to not be able to really know about someone or something by simply looking at them She doesn't look very bright, but you can't judge a book by its cover.
See also: book, cover, judge, not

You can't judge a book by its cover.

something that you say which means you cannot judge the quality or character of someone or something just by looking at them She doesn't look very intelligent, but you can't judge a book by its cover.
See also: book, cover, judge

any [judge/lawyer/teacher etc.] worth their salt

any judge, lawyer, teacher etc. who is good at their job Any lawyer worth his salt should be aware of the latest changes in taxation. No judge worth her salt would attempt to influence the jury.
See also: any, salt, worth

be as sober as a judge

to not be at all drunk It's awful when everyone else around you has been drinking and you're as sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

judge a book by its cover, one can't

One can't rely on outward appearances to know what something or someone is really like. For example, He seems very quiet, but you can't judge a book by its cover. [First half of 1900s]
See also: book, judge, one

sober as a judge

Not at all intoxicated, quite clear-headed, as in Even after three drinks he was sober as a judge. Why judges should be equated with sobriety is not known, but the simile was first recorded in 1694.
See also: judge, sober

(as) sober as a judge

mod. as sober (free from alcohol) as it is possible to be. Kelly—who was starched as could be—claimed to be sober as a judge.
See also: judge, sober

sober as a judge

verb
See also: judge, sober
References in periodicals archive ?
When consumers and culinary professionals see the ACI Best Taste, Best Product or Best of Class Award on food and culinary products for retail and foodservice products, they know that it has passed the rigorous tests applied by the ACI chef-based judging panel to uncover and honor the best products in the marketplace.
Since at least one scenario suggests a deal involving the judging in the ice dance (contested Friday, Sunday and Monday), some observers expected the ISU to act Thursday.
Rogge asked Cinquanta if the ice dance should be postponed until the pairs skating scandal was resolved, but Cinquanta reportedly assured the IOC president that judging in ice dancing would be fair and accurate.
When consumers and culinary professionals see the ACI Best Taste, Best Product, or Best of Class Award on food and culinary products for retail and foodservice products, they know that it has passed the rigorous test applied by our chef-based judging panel to uncover and honor the best products in the marketplace.
Cinquanta said the ISU will resist an outside investigation and maintained it could get its own house in order if it takes up ``revisions'' to the judging formula he plans to introduce at next Monday's ISU council meeting.
The American referee was the first to allege judging improprieties in pairs skating.
Judging panels consisted of Santa Clara University scholars and senior leaders from outside of the University in both public and private organizations.
Each judging panel was chaired by leading SCU scholars: Pete Facione, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences chaired the health panel; Emile McAnany, professor and department chair of SCU's communication department, chaired the education panel; Dorothy Glancy, law professor, chaired the environmental panel; Alex Field, Orradre Professor of Economics, chaired the economic development panel; Al Hammond, law professor, chaired the equality judging panel.
A common judging rubric was used to score the applicants and select the five finalists in each category.
For more information on the judging process or to arrange interviews, contact Kelly Shenefiel in SCU Media Relations at 408-554-5125 or kshenefiel@scu.
So we go to work, tasting the wines from coded glasses in the privacy of our own cubicle, marking down on our worksheets whether we think each wine should go on to the next level of judging, or in the case of small groupings, whether it deserves a gold, silver, bronze or no medal.
During the judging, we're allowed to eat as much cheese and crackers as we want.
As the days stretch on we move from judging small groupings of ice wines and semillons to '93 cabernet sauvignons to '94 zinfandels to oddball wines made from such grape varietals as chancellor, cortese and catawba.