yellow journalism

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yellow journalism

Sensationalistic journalism with the main goal of attracting attention and readers, rather than presenting an unbiased account of the news. It may have begun at the turn of the century, but yellow journalism is alive and well, from the supermarket tabloids to all the talking heads on cable news.
See also: yellow
References in periodicals archive ?
The discussions also included the potential opportunities and challenges for teaching data journalism in universities, in light of its global rise.
Meanwhile, Mona Abdel Maksoud, associate professor at the Faculty of Mass Communication, Cairo University, said that "we need to integrate data journalism in journalism school curriculums.
The world's changing culture of communications not only encourages users to create personal echo-chambers at the expense of information pluralism, it has also shredded the market models that used to nourish ethical journalism.
Journalism at its best can do this job, but not without fresh support.
Recent scholarship on the future of journalism education by Caitlin Petre and Max Besbris (2013) uncovered that entrepreneurial journalism educators actually mean three very different things when they talk at length about entrepreneurial journalism education.
What can the general concept of venture labor tell us about journalism in particular, and about labor in our current age of uncertainty more generally?
Although this is gradually changing, most literary and cultural critics today have only a sketchy knowledge of journalism history and even less of literary journalism studies or of the forms and practices of literary journalism.
The inroads of American literary journalism studies in US academic culture have been modest.
The 'Media Wars' debate and the ambiguous position of journalism as a discipline
The sometimes vitriolic debate between cultural studies and journalism educators in the late 1990s was triggered by the provocative (and likely tongue-in-cheek) proclamation by Hartley (1995, 1996) that journalism research was a 'terra nullius' of epistemology and Windschuttle's (1998: 31) retaliatory attack on the 'obscurantism' of cultural studies as an academic discipline.
UST is a center of development in journalism, recognized by the Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) in June 2013.
The humanitarian journalism award was presented to Sana Bokhlis of the 'Morocco today' magazine against her Rocherha people article while Khurshid Harfoush, a journalist with Al Ittihad newspaper won the specialised journalism award for his article 'Terrorism distorts the minds of children'.
These institutions follow the syllabi those as it is, for long with minimal change which indicates an uncritical acceptance of the dominant western notion of journalism courses for higher education.
Mcgoldrick and Lynch (2000) expanded Galtung's (1986) classification of peace journalism and war journalism and proposed 17 peace journalism-based practices for news coverage of war.
Given those roots, the focus has been primarily on the acquisition of skills professional journalists need to succeed and it has been hard to make the case that knowing the history of journalism will help aspiring reporters write better leads or ask more penetrating questions.