yellow journalism

(redirected from journalism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

yellow journalism

Sensationalistic journalism with the main goal of attracting attention and readers, rather than presenting an unbiased account of the news. It may have begun at the turn of the century, but yellow journalism is alive and well, from the supermarket tabloids to all the talking heads on cable news.
See also: yellow
References in periodicals archive ?
As Arab journalists mostly need to develop their technical skills, El-Eraqi has decided to hold the conference to gather media professionals and journalists in Arab countries who are interested in this kind of journalism, and offer workshops and trainings as well as conduct studies and surveys related to data journalism in the Arab world.
The discussions also included the potential opportunities and challenges for teaching data journalism in universities, in light of its global rise.
To encourage attachment to ethical values in the management and governance of journalism.
The world's changing culture of communications not only encourages users to create personal echo-chambers at the expense of information pluralism, it has also shredded the market models that used to nourish ethical journalism.
One of the ways journalism schools and journalism programs have responded to these employment challenges has been to argue for the increasing importance of entrepreneurial journalism education, the very definition of which is contested--as we will see below.
The most succinct self-definition comes from the CUNY journalism school website in describing its mission:
Building on the foundational work of Norman Sims, Sally Fisher Fishkin, Phyllis Frus, John Hartsock, David Abrahamson, David Eason, and others, American literary journalism studies is turning its attention to many more kinds of texts: Isabelle Wilkerson The Warmth of Other Sons (Kathy Forde), Slyvester Monroe's Brothers Black and Poor--a True Story of Survival (Isabelle Meuret), Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (Roberta Maguire), Meridel Le Sueuer's "Women on the Breadlines" and "I Was Marching" (Nancy Roberts); working out new terms of analysis and methodologies that advance older models: literary journalism and civic life (John J.
But despite such advances, challenges for American literary journalism studies persist.
journalism as a professional field of research whose creative works should be recognised as research in their own right, and
There will also be subjects that keep abreast with today's trends in journalism (such as data journalism) while some courses will emphasize ethics for journalists.
The Arab journalism award ceremony began with a short film that monitors the recent major important events that had an impact on Arab media.
World Journalism Education Council's data (2010) shows, a total of 159 public (read central and state in context of India) and private university journalism departments/schools (the actual number is more than 200 presently) are providing undergraduate (Bachelor of Arts--BA/ Bachelor of Social Sciences--BSS), and graduate (Masters of Arts--MA/ Masters of Social Sciences--MSS) degrees or Diplomas in journalism/mass communication in six South Asian countries, namely, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.
in journalism from Moscow for his thesis "the Leftist Journalism in Iraq".
Peace journalism brings before the audience all the black and the white sides of the conflict.
But the mismatch in temperament is only one of the reasons journalism history has played such a small part in journalism education.