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blow this joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow this joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow this joint.
See also: blow, joint, this

hop joint

A location where opium is dealt and smoked; an opium den. Though they've become pretty rare, you can still find a few hop joints downtown.
See also: hop, joint

nose out of joint

A phrase said of one who is upset, usually due to another's actions or words. Yeah, she's got her nose out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

blow the joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow the joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow the joint.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. slang To observe a place in order to familiarize oneself with its workings in preparation for some criminal activity (often robbery). Judging from the security footage, those men cased the joint hours before robbing it.
2. slang By extension, to thoroughly examine a place. In this usage, no devious motive is implied. As soon as my kids walking into the hotel room, they started casing the joint, exclaiming about everything from the TV to the mini-fridge.
See also: case, joint

(one's) nose is out of joint

One is upset or annoyed, usually due to another person's actions or words. Yeah, her nose is out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive. The kids' noses are out of joint because I took away their video games for the weekend.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

put (one's) nose out of joint

To upset one, usually through actions or words. Well, something put my mother's nose out of joint—what exactly did you say to her?
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

blow the joint

Sl. to get out of a place, usually in a hurry or without delay. Come on, let's blow the joint before there's trouble. They blew the joint about an hour ago.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

 
1. Sl. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (Underworld.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are. You could see he was casing the joint the way he hung around.
2. Sl. to look a place over. The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes. The old lady entered slowly, casing the joint for someone of her own age, and finally took a seat.
See also: case, joint

get one's nose out of joint and have one's nose out of joint; put one's nose out of joint

Fig. to resent that one has been slighted, neglected, or insulted. You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that. Now, don't get your nose out of joint. She didn't mean it.
See also: and, get, have, joint, nose, of, out, put

put someone's nose out of joint

Fig. to make someone resentful. What's wrong with Jill? What put her nose out of joint? Don't put your nose out of joint. I didn't mean anything by what I said.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square (meal)

a good and nutritious meal. (Always with quantifier when square is used without meal.) I need three squares a day—at least. The old beggar looks like he could use a square meal.

nose out of joint, have one's

Be upset or irritated, especially when displaced by someone. For example, Ever since Sheila got promoted he's had his nose out of joint. Similarly, put one's nose out of joint indicates the cause of the upset, as in The boss's praise of her assistant put Jean's nose out of joint. The earliest form of this idiom, first recorded in 1581, was thrust one's nose out of joint, with put appearing shortly thereafter. Presumably all these expressions allude to the face-distorting grimace made by one who is displeased.
See also: have, nose, of, out

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as in Trying to break his fall, he put his shoulder out of joint. [Late 1300s]
3. Out of order, inauspicious or unsatisfactory, as in The entire lineup of our team is out of joint. Shakespeare had this term in Hamlet (1:5): "The time is out of joint." [Early 1400s]
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

If something puts someone's nose out of joint, it offends or upsets them, because they think that they have not been treated with the respect that they deserve. Ian had his nose put out of joint when a colleague who had been with the company for less time than him was promoted and he wasn't. Note: You can also say that someone's nose is out of joint or that someone has their nose out of joint. A few noses in the firm are out of joint since the arrival of a dynamic young manager. Note: You often use this expression to suggest that the person who is offended thinks that they are more important than they really are.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the joint

reconnoitre a place before carrying out a robbery. informal
See also: case, joint

out of joint

1 (of a specified joint) out of position; dislocated. 2 in a state of disorder or disorientation.
2 1601 William Shakespeare Hamlet The time is out of joint.
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

upset or annoy someone. informal
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the ˈjoint

(informal) look carefully around a building so that you can plan how to steal things from it at a later time: I saw two men here earlier. Do you think they were casing the joint?
See also: case, joint

out of ˈjoint


1 (of a bone) pushed out of its correct position
2 not working or behaving in the normal way: Time is thrown completely out of joint in the opening chapters of the book.
See also: joint, of, out

put somebody’s ˈnose out of joint

(informal) upset or annoy somebody, especially by not giving them enough attention: The new teacher speaks much better German than he does. That’s going to put his nose out of joint.
If a bone is out of joint, it is pushed out of its correct position.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

blow the joint

tv. to get out of a place, probably in a hurry. (see also joint.) Come on, let’s blow the joint before there’s trouble.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. tv. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (see also joint.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are.
2. tv. to look a place over. (No criminal intent. From sense 1) The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes.
See also: case, joint

clip joint

n. a business establishment that cheats customers. The clip joint on Fourth Street was busted last night.
See also: clip, joint

creep joint

and creep dive
n. an unpleasant place populated by creeps. You shouldn’t go into a creep joint like that alone. What’s a nice girl like you doing in a creep dive like this?
See also: creep, joint

get one’s nose out of joint

tv. to feel slighted by something someone has done; to take offense at something. (see also put someone’s nose out of joint.) You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that.
See also: get, joint, nose, of, out

heavy joint

n. a marijuana cigarette tipped with phencyclidine (PCP). (Drugs.) He said something about smoking a heavy joint just before he passed out.
See also: heavy, joint

joint

1. n. a tavern; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) I wanted to open a joint, but I don’t have the cash.
2. n. a low-class establishment; a dive. Let’s get out of this crummy joint.
3. n. a tobacco cigarette. Why are beggars being choosers about their joints all of a sudden?
4. n. a marijuana cigarette. The joint wasn’t enough to carry him very long.
5. n. a penis. (Usually objectionable.) He covered his joint and ran for the dressing room.
6. n. a jail; a prison. (Underworld.) Lefty just got out of the joint.
7. n. a toilet. I gotta get to the joint fast!

juice joint

n. a liquor establishment; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) His grandfather ran a juice joint during prohibition.
See also: joint, juice

put someone’s nose out of joint

tv. to cause someone to feel slighted; to cause someone to take offense. (see also get one’s nose out of joint.) I’m sorry we didn’t invite you. We didn’t mean to put your nose out of joint.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square

1. mod. old-fashioned; law-abiding; stodgy. Man, you are really square.
2. n. a person who behaves properly. You are a square if I ever saw one.
3. and square joint n. a tobacco cigarette, compared to a marijuana cigarette. I’ll take a reefer. I’ve heard that square joints will give you cancer.
4. tv. to settle or to make something right. Will twenty bucks square the matter?
5. Go to square (meal).

square joint

verb
See square
See also: joint, square

square

verb

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as a bone.
2. Informal
a. Not harmonious; inconsistent.
b. Out of order; inauspicious or unsatisfactory.
c. In bad spirits or humor; out of sorts.
See also: joint, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
The joints between the bones of the skull are an example.
by comparing adjacent joints or looking to the contour edges of connecting parts), because in wave soldering, solder will adhere only to a solder connection when the latter's solderability is perfect.
The SX sideshaft joint design was driven by OEM desires for maintaining common suspension and platform dimensions while offering engines with widely varying power outputs.
Benefits of the SX rotary joint are said to include positive sealing; increased life and reliability; extended seal life and reduced maintenance; self-aligning seal with longer life; improved joint and syphon support; and application flexibility.
By the way, you don't need the thrust washer, item 9 shown on Page 3-426 of TM 9-2320-272-24-1 with the new CV joint.
A review of the literature and careful analysis of the clinicopathologic features of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint reveal that the vast majority of reported cases were of the extra-articular variant of this disease, which is associated with more aggressive local infiltrative behavior and a higher rate of local recurrence than is the localized type.
While you can't always avoid trauma to the joints, "you can make sure your joints are properly rehabilitated after an injury," says Millar.
Moreover, as in rheumatoid arthritis, certain immune sentinels called T cells invaded the inflamed rodent joints.
And people taking this drug were less likely to develop any new joint damage during treatment, and showed a slowing down of destruction in their already damaged joints,'' said lead study author Dr.
Regulatory issues affecting joint replacement: the case of the UK
p fo bet secon ELLIPSOIDAL JOINT An ellipsoidal joint is an oval-shaped joint, allowing all types of movements except pivotal.
A comparison of medical drainage (needle aspiration) and surgical drainage (arthrotomy or arthroscopy) in the initial treatment of infected joints.
The introduction of a new material - carbon graphite - led the way in the 1940s to the development of the next generation of rotary joints.
Athletes and coaches interested in maximizing muscular development in a safe and efficient fashion must have a thorough understanding of the two types of exercise movements - single joint and multi-joint.
Joints loosen when the wood ages and shrinks or when the glue dries out.