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blow this joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow this joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow this joint.
See also: blow, joint, this

hop joint

A location where opium is dealt and smoked; an opium den. Though they've become pretty rare, you can still find a few hop joints downtown.
See also: hop, joint

nose out of joint

A phrase said of one who is upset, usually due to another's actions or words. Yeah, she's got her nose out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

blow the joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow the joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow the joint.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. slang To observe a place in order to familiarize oneself with its workings in preparation for some criminal activity (often robbery). Judging from the security footage, those men cased the joint hours before robbing it.
2. slang By extension, to thoroughly examine a place. In this usage, no devious motive is implied. As soon as my kids walking into the hotel room, they started casing the joint, exclaiming about everything from the TV to the mini-fridge.
See also: case, joint

(one's) nose is out of joint

A phrase said of one who is upset or annoyed, usually due to another person's actions or words. Yeah, her nose is out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive. The kids' noses are out of joint because I took away their video game console for the weekend.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

put (one's) nose out of joint

To upset someone, usually through one's actions or words. Well, something put my mother's nose out of joint—what exactly did you say to her?
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

blow the joint

Sl. to get out of a place, usually in a hurry or without delay. Come on, let's blow the joint before there's trouble. They blew the joint about an hour ago.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

 
1. Sl. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (Underworld.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are. You could see he was casing the joint the way he hung around.
2. Sl. to look a place over. The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes. The old lady entered slowly, casing the joint for someone of her own age, and finally took a seat.
See also: case, joint

get one's nose out of joint and have one's nose out of joint; put one's nose out of joint

Fig. to resent that one has been slighted, neglected, or insulted. You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that. Now, don't get your nose out of joint. She didn't mean it.
See also: and, get, have, joint, nose, of, out, put

put someone's nose out of joint

Fig. to make someone resentful. What's wrong with Jill? What put her nose out of joint? Don't put your nose out of joint. I didn't mean anything by what I said.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square (meal)

a good and nutritious meal. (Always with quantifier when square is used without meal.) I need three squares a day—at least. The old beggar looks like he could use a square meal.

nose out of joint, have one's

Be upset or irritated, especially when displaced by someone. For example, Ever since Sheila got promoted he's had his nose out of joint. Similarly, put one's nose out of joint indicates the cause of the upset, as in The boss's praise of her assistant put Jean's nose out of joint. The earliest form of this idiom, first recorded in 1581, was thrust one's nose out of joint, with put appearing shortly thereafter. Presumably all these expressions allude to the face-distorting grimace made by one who is displeased.
See also: have, nose, of, out

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as in Trying to break his fall, he put his shoulder out of joint. [Late 1300s]
3. Out of order, inauspicious or unsatisfactory, as in The entire lineup of our team is out of joint. Shakespeare had this term in Hamlet (1:5): "The time is out of joint." [Early 1400s]
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

If something puts someone's nose out of joint, it offends or upsets them, because they think that they have not been treated with the respect that they deserve. Ian had his nose put out of joint when a colleague who had been with the company for less time than him was promoted and he wasn't. Note: You can also say that someone's nose is out of joint or that someone has their nose out of joint. A few noses in the firm are out of joint since the arrival of a dynamic young manager. Note: You often use this expression to suggest that the person who is offended thinks that they are more important than they really are.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the joint

reconnoitre a place before carrying out a robbery. informal
See also: case, joint

out of joint

1 (of a specified joint) out of position; dislocated. 2 in a state of disorder or disorientation.
2 1601 William Shakespeare Hamlet The time is out of joint.
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

upset or annoy someone. informal
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the ˈjoint

(informal) look carefully around a building so that you can plan how to steal things from it at a later time: I saw two men here earlier. Do you think they were casing the joint?
See also: case, joint

out of ˈjoint


1 (of a bone) pushed out of its correct position
2 not working or behaving in the normal way: Time is thrown completely out of joint in the opening chapters of the book.
See also: joint, of, out

put somebody’s ˈnose out of joint

(informal) upset or annoy somebody, especially by not giving them enough attention: The new teacher speaks much better German than he does. That’s going to put his nose out of joint.
If a bone is out of joint, it is pushed out of its correct position.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

blow the joint

tv. to get out of a place, probably in a hurry. (see also joint.) Come on, let’s blow the joint before there’s trouble.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. tv. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (see also joint.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are.
2. tv. to look a place over. (No criminal intent. From sense 1) The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes.
See also: case, joint

clip joint

n. a business establishment that cheats customers. The clip joint on Fourth Street was busted last night.
See also: clip, joint

creep joint

and creep dive
n. an unpleasant place populated by creeps. You shouldn’t go into a creep joint like that alone. What’s a nice girl like you doing in a creep dive like this?
See also: creep, joint

get one’s nose out of joint

tv. to feel slighted by something someone has done; to take offense at something. (see also put someone’s nose out of joint.) You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that.
See also: get, joint, nose, of, out

heavy joint

n. a marijuana cigarette tipped with phencyclidine (PCP). (Drugs.) He said something about smoking a heavy joint just before he passed out.
See also: heavy, joint

joint

1. n. a tavern; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) I wanted to open a joint, but I don’t have the cash.
2. n. a low-class establishment; a dive. Let’s get out of this crummy joint.
3. n. a tobacco cigarette. Why are beggars being choosers about their joints all of a sudden?
4. n. a marijuana cigarette. The joint wasn’t enough to carry him very long.
5. n. a penis. (Usually objectionable.) He covered his joint and ran for the dressing room.
6. n. a jail; a prison. (Underworld.) Lefty just got out of the joint.
7. n. a toilet. I gotta get to the joint fast!

juice joint

n. a liquor establishment; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) His grandfather ran a juice joint during prohibition.
See also: joint, juice

put someone’s nose out of joint

tv. to cause someone to feel slighted; to cause someone to take offense. (see also get one’s nose out of joint.) I’m sorry we didn’t invite you. We didn’t mean to put your nose out of joint.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square

1. mod. old-fashioned; law-abiding; stodgy. Man, you are really square.
2. n. a person who behaves properly. You are a square if I ever saw one.
3. and square joint n. a tobacco cigarette, compared to a marijuana cigarette. I’ll take a reefer. I’ve heard that square joints will give you cancer.
4. tv. to settle or to make something right. Will twenty bucks square the matter?
5. Go to square (meal).

square joint

verb
See square
See also: joint, square

square

verb

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as a bone.
2. Informal
a. Not harmonious; inconsistent.
b. Out of order; inauspicious or unsatisfactory.
c. In bad spirits or humor; out of sorts.
See also: joint, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Since fluid pressure is used to energize the seal, rotary pressure joints are self-adjusting for wear.
A single-joint (or primary) exercise involves the movement of only one joint, enabling the athlete to isolate a single muscle.
It is possible that only one joint is loose, but often all the joints will need to be reglued.
Scientists do not yet know why immune cells accumulate in arthritis-diseased joints (SN: 9/4/82, p.
This significantly contributes to establishing Artelon(R) as the biomaterial of choice and the spacer concept as the preferred therapy for treatment of osteoarthritis in small bones and joints.
The Joint Juice joint health assessment is the first step individuals can take to determine the state of their joint health and learn more ways to keep their joints young - including maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise and taking crucial vitamins and supplements, including glucosamine and chondroitin.
The primary endpoint of the study is to establish the safety of higher doses and of repeat administration of tgAAC94 into the joints of subjects with and without concomitant TNF-alpha inhibitor therapy.
com for an illustrative assessment that determines the condition of their joints based on a series of 15 questions regarding Body Mass Index (BMI), diet, exercise, lifestyle, and joint health history.
At age six, children were assessed for bone or cartilage damage using X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of damage-prone joints (elbows, knees, and ankles).
An active lifestyle begins with healthy joints and there are several simple steps individuals can take to keep their joints young - such as weight loss, regular exercise or taking crucial vitamins and minerals, including glucosamine and chrondroitin," says Dr.
In the non-injected joints of the tgAAC94 treated groups there also appears to be a trend in the decrease in mean tenderness and swelling scores over time, which was not observed in the subjects receiving placebo.
tgAAC94 is being developed initially as a complementary therapy for patients who may not achieve adequate relief with existing arthritis treatments or others who have disease limited to a few joints and therefore, may not need systemic protein therapies.
The innovative T40256 service tool assists technicians both in proper removal of corroded original parts and installation of Moog replacement ball joints.
To date, clinical studies have shown that collagen hydrolysate may be able to protect joints from damage, strengthen joints and reduce pain from conditions like osteoarthritis.
Healthy Joint Extract contains the same beneficial properties of the noni fruit but in a highly concentrated and powerful form along with glucosamine and curcumin extracts which are well known for their ability to sooth stiff, achy joints and improve mobility.