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join the majority

euphemism To die. A: "I heard there was a death in your family." B: "Oh yeah, some distant relative joined the majority."
See also: join, majority

Could I join you?

 and (Do you) care if I join you?; (Do you) mind if I join you?
Will you permit me to sit with you? (An inquiry seeking permission to sit at someone's table or join someone else in some activity. Also used with can or may in place of could.) Tom came into the cafe and saw Fred and Sally sitting in a booth by the window. Coming up to them, Tom said, "Could I join you?"
See also: could, join

If you can't beat them, join them.

 and If you can't lick 'em, join 'em.
Prov. If you have to give up fighting some group because you can't win, band together with them. (The version with lick is informal.) Jill: I just got a kitten. Jane: I can't believe it! You used to hatepeople who owned cats. Jill: If you can't beat them, join them. Alan: I hear you're a Republican now. Fred: Yeah, I figured, if you can't lick 'em, join 'em.
See also: beat, if, join

join forces (with someone)

Fig. to combine one's efforts with someone else's efforts. The older boys joined forces with the younger ones to sing the school song. Let's join forces with the other faction and run our own slate of candidates.
See also: force, join

join hands

[for people] to hold hands so that each person is holding the hands of two other people; [for two people] to hold each other's hands. Let us join hands and pray together. The dancers joined hands and formed a circle that moved to the left.
See also: hand, join

join in (with something)

to participate in doing something. The older boys joined in with the singing. I'm glad they joined in. We needed basses.
See also: join

join in (with something)

to participate in doing something. The older boys joined in with the singing. I'm glad they joined in. We needed basses.
See also: join

join (someone) with (someone else)

 and join (something) with (something else)
to connect things or people. I joined Fred with the others. We joined the older puppies with the full-grown dogs.
See also: join

join (something and something else) together

to connect or unite things. We joined the pipe and the hose together. He joined together all the blue wires and the red ones.
See also: join, together

join (something) to (something else)

to connect something to something else. We joined our club to the other club. We joined our chorus to the other chorus, making a huge singing group.
See also: join

join something with something else Go to join someone with someone

else.
See also: else, join

Join the club!

Inf. an expression indicating that the person spoken to is in the same, or a similar, unfortunate state as the speaker. You don't have anyplace to stay? Join the club! Neither do we. Did you get fired too? Join the club!
See also: join

join the fray

 and jump into the fray; enter the fray
Fig. to join the fight or argument. After listening to the argument, Mary decided to jump into the fray. Tom joined the fray and immediately got knocked down.
See also: fray, join

join up

to join some organization. The club has opened its membership rolls again. Are you going to join up? I can't afford to join up.
See also: join, up

join (up) with someone or something

to bring oneself into association with someone or something. I decided to join up with the other group. Our group joined with another similar group.
See also: join

joined at the hip

Sl. closely connected; always together. Those two are joined at the hip. They are always together. Sam and Martha are joined at the hip.
See also: hip, join

take issue with someone

to argue with someone. I heard your last statement and I have to take issue with you. Tom took issue with Maggie about the cost of the house.
See also: issue, take

take issue with something

to disagree with or argue about something. I have to take issue with that statement. I want to take issue with the last statement you made.
See also: issue, take

with (one's) eyes (wide) open

Fig. totally aware of what is going on. I went into this with my eyes open. We all started with eyes open but didn't realize what could happen to us.
See also: eye, open

(Would you) care to join us?

Do you want to join us? Tom and Mary saw Fred and Sally sitting at another table in the restaurant. Tom went over to them and said, "Would you care to join us?" Mary: Isn't that Bill and Sue over there? John: Yes, it is. Shall I ask them to join us? Mary: Why not? John (after reaching the other table): Hi, you guys! Care to join us? Bill: Love to, but Sue's mom is going to be along any minute. Thanks anyway.
See also: care, join

with your eyes (wide) open

understanding the true character of someone or something I knew Bill for a long time, and I went into this relationship with my eyes wide open.
See also: eye, open

enter the fray

also join the fray
to become involved in a very competitive situation Cable TV companies have entered the fray, using their high-speed lines to provide Internet access.
See also: enter, fray

join hands (with somebody)

to unite with other people or groups Many people are ready to join hands to improve health care around the world.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of join hands (to hold the hand of the person next to you, connecting all of the people in a group)
See also: hand, join

joined at the hip

1. very closely connected The two companies have been joined at the hip since their founders went camping together a hundred years ago.
2. together The new law would keep unhappy couples joined at the hip for the sake of their children.
See also: hip, join

take issue with somebody

to disagree with someone or something I take issue with people who say it is unpatriotic to criticize our government. Thorogood took issue with the story that he had a drinking problem, calling it a nasty rumor.
See also: issue, take

join in

to take part with others in an activity We play touch football on Saturdays if the weather is good, so bring sneakers with you and join in.
See also: join

join up

to become a member of the military Levy joined up in World War II, received his citizenship and ended up a corporal in the combat engineers.
See also: join, up

join the ranks of something

to become part of a larger group or organization Their country will join the ranks of the most developed nations of the world in four or five years.
See also: join, of, rank

Join the club!

  (British, American & Australian) also Welcome to the club! (American & Australian)
something that you say to someone who has just told you about an experience or problem that they have had in order to show that you have had the same experience or problem too 'I can't stop eating chocolate.' 'Join the club!' 'We can't afford a vacation this year.' 'Welcome to the club!'
See also: join

with your eyes open

knowing about all the problems there could be with something that you want to do 'You want to get married? But you're only 18!' 'I'm doing this with my eyes open, so don't worry about me.' It was difficult to succeed in the acting profession but I went into it with my eyes open.
See Close your eyes and think of England, couldn't believe eyes, cry eyes out, feast eyes on, hit between the eyes, keep eyes peeled, open eyes to, be up to ears in
See also: eye, open

enter/join the fray

to become involved in an argument or a fight Members of the royal family rarely enter the political fray.
See also: enter, fray

join the ranks of something

to become part of a large group Thousands of young people join the ranks of the unemployed each summer when they leave school.
See Join the club!, enter the fray
See also: join, of, rank

be joined at the hip

if you say that two people are joined at the hip, you mean that they are very friendly with each other and spend more time together than is usual I can go to London without Mike. We're not joined at the hip, you know.
See also: hip, join

if you can't beat 'em, join 'em

Also, if you can't lick 'em, join 'em. If you can't defeat your opponents you might be better off by switching to their side. For example, Seeing that no one else was willing to stick with the old software program, Marcia learned the new one, noting if you can't beat 'em, join 'em , or I opposed a new school library, but the town voted for it, so I'll support it-if you can't lick 'em, join 'em . This expression dates from about 1940 and originally alluded to political opponents. The opposite idea is expressed in an advertising slogan used in the 1960s and 1970s by a cigarette company, in which the smoker would fight rather than switch brands.
See also: beat, if, join

join forces

Act together, combine efforts. For example, The public relations people joined forces to get better coverage for their candidates. This expression originally referred to combining military forces. [Mid-1500s]
See also: force, join

join the club

A phrase used to express sympathy for a common experience. For example, You waited three hours for the doctor? Join the club! [c. 1940]
See also: club, join

take issue with

Disagree with, as in I take issue with those figures; they don't include last month's sales. This idiom comes from legal terminology, where it was originally put as to join issue, meaning "take the opposite side of a case." [Late 1600s]
See also: issue, take

join in

v.
To take part in something; participate in something: The tenors started singing, and then the sopranos joined in. The adults joined in the celebration.
See also: join

join up

v.
1. To become a member of some group or organization: After the recruiter's speech, I decided to join up.
2. To collaborate or team up with someone: The advertising firm joined up with the baseball team to promote the new manager.
3. To connect together: The points join up to form a straight line.
4. To connect something with some other thing: Join up the dots, and you'll see a picture. When we join these pieces up, the puzzle will be completed.
See also: join, up

joined at the hip

mod. closely connected; as thick as thieves. (As Siamese twins are joined.) Those two are joined at the hip. They are always together.
See also: hip, join

Welcome to the club

and Join the club and WTTC
sent. & comp. abb. The rest of us are in the same situation. So you’re short of cash? Welcome to the club. You’re just like us. Join the club; we’ve got jackets.
See also: club, welcome

Join the club

verb
See also: club, join

with eyes open

verb
See also: eye, open

with (one's) eyes open

Aware of the risks involved.
See also: eye, open

join issue

1. To enter into controversy.
2. Law To submit an issue for decision.
See also: issue, join
References in periodicals archive ?
Valves, air cylinders, regulators, and slide friction may influence the joining velocity and will cause inconsistencies in the welding process.
If she had asked for a copy of the club's reading list before joining, Hart would have known that the majority of the titles were heavy hitters.
Prior to joining Aries Deitch & Endelson, he served as executive vice president of American Continental Properties.
Norwegian company specializes in spin and rotational welding equipment for joining sockets and connectors to PE, PP, and PVC sewer and drainage pipe.
Prior to joining Stein White Nelligan, White served as a producer and information architect for Plumb Design.
BASF claims that collar joining provides advantages over other means of plastic-metal joining.
Prior to joining AKAM Associates, Fingerman worked as the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development.
as chief legal counsel before joining Blue Cross in 1993.
laser welding appears likely to evolve into a joining method for niche applications where it offers cost or performance benefits over proven alternatives like ultrasonic, vibration, and hot-plate welding.
Since joining the firm in 1996, La cancellera has undertaken such projects as the acquisition of 750 Seventh Ave.
Prior to joining Fitch, Anthony was a Senior Associate of Health Industries Advisory with PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP in Chicago.
Prior to joining Rockwood Realty, Gilbert Solomon served as vice president of business development at Save the Date, Inc.
Prior to joining IXIS, he spent nine years as a principal and senior vice president in developing and implementing turnkey fee-based asset management programs for FundQuest, Incorporated.
Prior to joining Insignia/ESG, she served as a sales associate with the commercial and land division of Century 21 Worden & Green.