johnson


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

johnson

1. n. a thing. (see also jones.) Hand me that little johnson.
2. n. a penis. (Again, a thing. Usually objectionable.) Zip up, or your johnson’ll get out.
References in classic literature ?
But, in spite of rebuffs and disappointments, Johnson would not give in.
But if Johnson starved he never cringed, and once when a bookseller spoke rudely to him he knocked him down with one of his own books.
The misery of this time was such that long years after Johnson burst into tears at the memory of it.
And being a Tory, Johnson took good care, as he afterwards confessed, "that the Whig dogs should not have the best of it.
The tragedy called Irene which Johnson had brought with him to London was at length after twelve years produced by Garrick, who had by that time become a famous actor.
It seems as if there were here a story which might be made to stir our hearts, but Johnson makes it merely dull.
This paper was continued for about two years, Johnson writing all but five of the essays.
Johnson never for a moment loses sight of "a grand moral end.
In the days when Johnson wrote, this style was greatly admired, but now we have come back to thinking that the simplest words are best, or, at least, that we must suit our words to our subject.
Johnson," I said, "and attend to the work of unpacking the extra instruments and having them properly set upon the bridge.
It was then that Johnson came hurrying to the bridge.
Those which Johnson had seen him destroy had been a third set which only Alvarez had known was aboard the Coldwater.
But it accomplished nothing other than to convince me that there were several officers upon it who were in full sympathy with Johnson, for, though no charges had been preferred against him, the board went out of its way specifically to exonerate him in its findings.
Only that morning, Lieutenant Johnson had told me that he feared that it would be impossible to repair the generators.
Well, Mr Johnson,' said Mrs Crummles, who was seated there in full regal costume, with the phenomenon as the Maiden in her maternal arms, 'next week for Ryde, then for Winchester, then for--'
Full browser ?