jewel

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Related to jewels: bejeweled, Gemstones

crown jewel

1. A precious jewel that is part of or featured on a monarch's or sovereign's regalia. Just one crown jewel from the Queen's regalia is worth enough money to buy a small country.
2. An asset or possession prized as being the best of a group of similar things. This vintage 1965 Corvette Stingray is the crown jewel of my car collection. The works of Shakespeare are the crown jewels of English drama.
See also: crown, jewel

crown jewels

1. The precious jewels, and the regalia or which they are featured, of a monarch or sovereign, as worn or used on a state occasion. One of the greatest mysteries of 20th-century Ireland was the case of the Irish Crown Jewels, which were stolen from Dublin Castle in 1907 and never recovered.
2. slang A man's genitals, especially the testicles. When she heard he had an affair, she kicked him right in the crown jewels.
See also: crown, jewel

family jewels

slang Male genitalia, especially the testicles. An allusion to the testes' role in producing offspring and thus maintaining the family line. When she heard he had an affair, she kicked him right in the family jewels.
See also: family, jewel

the jewel in the crown

An asset or possession prized as being the best of a group of similar things. This vintage 1965 Corvette Stingray is the jewel in the crown of my car collection. The works of Shakespeare are the jewels in the crown of English drama.
See also: crown, jewel

crown jewels

1. A prized possession or asset, as in The Iliad and Odyssey are the crown jewels of ancient literature, or The software products are the company's crown jewels. This usage transfers the value of royal jewels to some other object. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, family jewels. The male genitals, especially the testicles. For example, She gave the would-be mugger a hard kick in the family jewels. A slang euphemism, the term dates from the 1970s, and the variant from the early 1900s.
See also: crown, jewel

the jewel in someone's/something's crown

or

the jewel in the crown of someone/something

COMMON If something or someone is the jewel in someone's or something's crown or the jewel in the crown of someone or something, it is the best thing they have, or their greatest achievement. He has written a number of excellent books but this novel is surely the jewel in his crown. The jewel in the architectural crown of North Yorkshire is almost certainly Castle Howard. Note: This expression was known in Victorian times, but is probably most well known as the title of a novel by Paul Scott, published in 1966, that formed part of a series set in the Raj, or Victorian India. In this title, India is seen as the `jewel', and the `crown' is the British Empire.
See also: crown, jewel

the (or your) family jewels

a man's genitals. informal
See also: family, jewel

the jewel in the (or someone's) crown

the most attractive or successful part of something.
In the early 20th century, this was used as a term for the British imperial colonies as a whole. The Jewel in the Crown was subsequently used by Paul Scott as the title of the first novel of his Raj Quartet, which is set in the last days of British rule in India.
See also: crown, jewel

the jewel in the ˈcrown

the most attractive or valuable part of something: The research facility is considered the jewel in the crown of the nation’s technology industry.
See also: crown, jewel

family jewels

n. the testicles. (Jocular and euphemistic. They are necessary to produce a family.) Hey, careful of the family jewels!
See also: family, jewel
References in classic literature ?
I noticed that Miss Havisham put down the jewel exactly on the spot from which she had taken it up.
In the long cedar chests that lined the west gallery of his house, he had stored away many rare and beautiful specimens of what is really the raiment of the Bride of Christ, who must wear purple and jewels and fine linen that she may hide the pallid macerated body that is worn by the suffering that she seeks for and wounded by self-inflicted pain.
Being assured of this I returned to the cavern, and amassed a rich treasure of diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and jewels of all kinds which strewed the ground.
Joyfully Ripple gave her the chain; but, as soon as it touched her hand, the jewels melted like snow, and fell in bright drops to the ground; at this the Queen's eyes flashed, and the Spirits gathered angrily about poor Ripple, who looked sadly at the broken chain, and thought in vain what she could give, to win the thing she longed so earnestly for.
For myself, hiding the jewel under my cloak, I shall hie me back to my attic chamber, in one of the darksome alleys of London.
Your ladyship does not generally take your jewels with you into the country.
Sometimes very fine jewels will fly all to pieces if a man holds them in his hand, and knows the proper way.
THE ring is on my hand, And the wreath is on my brow; Satins and jewels grand Are all at my command, And I am happy now.
In the larger and older jewels every facet may stand for a bloody deed.
if I could only get my ball again, I would give all my fine clothes and jewels, and everything that I have in the world.
Still, if it's a dinner-party, the hostess won't leave her jewels upstairs.
I am like my father--witless in matters of the heart, and of a poor way with women; yet the jewels that strew these royal garden paths--the trees, the flowers, the sward--all must have read the love that has filled my heart since first my eyes were made new by imaging your perfect face and form; so how could you alone have been blind to it?
Dorothea, dear, if you don't mind--if you are not very busy--suppose we looked at mamma's jewels to-day, and divided them?
Unopposed they reached the royal palace and marched up the marble steps, which had once been thickly crusted with emeralds but were now filled with tiny holes where the jewels had been ruthlessly torn from their settings by the Army of Revolt.
You would surely have thought that I had been detected in no less a heinous crime than the purloining of the Crown Jewels from the Tower, or putting poison in the coffee of His Majesty the King.