jest

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Related to jests: take a joke

in jest

For fun; as a joke; without sincerity. I know your remarks were only in jest, but they still hurt my feelings.
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there's many a true word spoken in jest

The things that one jokes about may in fact be true or become true. She might sound happy, but I'm not convinced—there's many a true word spoken in jest.
See also: jest, many, spoken, true, word

jest about someone or something

to make jokes about someone or something. There is no need to jest about Lady Bracknell. I wish you would not jest about that.
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jest at someone or something

to make fun of someone or something. Please don't jest at my cousin. Is someone jesting at my hairdo?
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jest with someone

to joke with someone; to try to fool someone. Surely you are jesting with me. Don't jest with me!
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Many a true word is spoken in jest.

 and There's many a true word spoken in jest.
Prov. Just because something is said as a joke, it can still be true. Fred: Why did you make a joke about my being stingy? Do you really think I'm cheap? Ellen: Of course not, don't be silly. It was just a joke. Fred: But many a true word is spoken in jest.
See also: jest, many, spoken, true, word

in ˈjest

as a joke: The remark was made half in jest.‘Many a true word is spoken in jest,’ thought Rosie (= people often say things as a joke that are actually true).
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References in classic literature ?
How can the king have the heart to jest about a man who has rendered him so many and such great services?
as to the king," said Monk, "fear nothing, my dear Monsieur d'Artagnan; the king will not jest with Monk, I assure you
Thar she was, showing em, as innocent--ye see, it's jest here, Jinny don't know.
Well, I'm mighty glad to hear ye all and see ye all once more, 'cause I don't know when I'll be gone to glory; but I've done got ready, chil'en; 'pears like I'd got my little bundle all tied up, and my bonnet on, jest a waitin' for the stage to come along and take me home; sometimes, in the night, I think I hear the wheels a rattlin', and I'm lookin' out all the time; now, you jest be ready too, for I tell ye all, chil'en," she said striking her staff hard on the floor, "dat ar glory is a mighty thing
We sha'n't rob 'em of nothing at all but jest this money.
She's turrible hard to get along with, an' kind o' heaves benefits at your head, same 's she would bricks; but they're benefits jest the same, an' mebbe it's your job to kind o' pay for 'em in good behavior.
Now you've had all you can stan' to-night, poor little soul, without gettin' a fit o' sickness; an' Mirandy'll be sore an' cross an' in no condition for argyment; so my plan is jest this: to drive you over to the brick house in my top buggy; to have you set back in the corner, an' I git out an' go to the side door; an' when I git your aunt Mirandy 'n' aunt Jane out int' the shed to plan for a load o' wood I'm goin' to have hauled there this week, you'll slip out o' the buggy and go upstairs to bed.
I've knet yeh eight pair of socks, Henry, and I've put in all yer best shirts, because I want my boy to be jest as warm and comf'able as anybody in the army.
You jest wait 'til to-morrow, and you'll see one of the biggest battles ever was.
I dunno what was in your pockets when I dried your kit, fer I didn't look to see; but I'd say, using the very same words ez you used jest now, neither me nor dad - an' we was the only two that teched you after you was brought aboard - knows anythin' 'baout the money.
Jest an' right - right an' jest," said Troop, with the ghost of a dry smile.
She jest seems to have been born with a sort of chronic spite agin men and Methodists.
He stood beside me, but did not venture to touch me or to speak for a few seconds; then, approaching a little nearer, he dropped on one knee - not in mock humility, but to bring himself nearer my level, and leaning his hand on the arm of the chair, he began in a low voice: 'It is all nonsense, Helen - a jest, a mere nothing - not worth a thought.
Some years he jest travels, week in and week out, and it's always in heathen countries--Egypt and Asia and the Desert of Sarah, you know.
But he don't never seem ter want ter spend no money here--leastways, not for jest livin'.