jazz

(redirected from jazzer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

good enough for jazz

Sufficient to suit the purpose(s) at hand without needing to be perfect. There are still a few kinks to work out in how users' comments are displayed, but it's good enough for jazz at the moment.
See also: enough, good, jazz

and all that jazz

And everything else; and many related things. If we're going to paint this weekend, we need rollers, drop cloths, and all that jazz. My sister is involved in so many extracurricular activities—student council, Model UN, the literary magazine, and all that jazz.
See also: all, and, jazz, that

jazz up

To make something fancier, more festive, more exciting, etc., often through some form of adornment. I've decided to jazz up my wardrobe with some statement shoes and other funky accessories. You need to add some excitement your story—jazz it up a bit.
See also: jazz, up

and all that jazz

and all that stuff; and all that nonsense. I need some glue, paper, string, and all that jazz to make a kite. She told me I was selfish, hateful, rude, ugly, and all that jazz.
See also: all, and, jazz, that

jazz someone or something up

to make someone or something more exciting or sexy; to make someone or something appeal more to contemporary tastes. Let's jazz this room up a little bit. They jazzed up Donna till she looked like a rock star.
See also: jazz, up

jazzed (up)

 
1. alert; having a positive state of mind. I am jazzed up and ready to face life. Those guys were jazzed and ready for the game.
2. . intoxicated. Dave was a bit jazzed up, but not terribly. Gert was jazzed out of her mind.
3. . enhanced; with something added; made more enticing. The third act was jazzed up with livelier music.
4. . forged or altered. Better not try to cash a jazzed check at this bank.
See also: jazz

jazz up

1. Enliven, make more interesting, as in They jazzed up the living room with a new rug, or They decided to include a comedy act to jazz up the program.
2. Modify so as to increase its performance, as in Peter wanted to jazz up his motorbike with a stronger engine. Both usages are colloquialisms from the mid-1900s. Also see juice up.
See also: jazz, up

and all that jazz

INFORMAL
People say and all that jazz to mean other things of a similar kind to the thing or things they have been talking about. She's a successful businesswoman — nice house, big car and all that jazz. As the youngest member of the group, he represented youth, modernity, the future and all that jazz. Note: This expression is often used to express slight disapproval.
See also: all, and, jazz, that

and all that jazz

and such similar things. informal
Of unknown origin, jazz was used informally to mean ‘meaningless talk’ within a decade of the word's first appearance in its musical sense, in the early 20th century. This phrase was a mid 20th-century development.
1960 Punch Politics, world affairs, film stars' babies and all that jazz, the things that the adult world seems obsessed with, do not interest us at all.
See also: all, and, jazz, that

and all that ˈjazz

(spoken, informal) and things like that: I was no good at history at school — dates and battles and all that jazz.
See also: all, and, jazz, that

jazz up

v. Slang
To make something or someone appear more interesting; enliven something or someone: We jazzed up the apartment with beaded curtains. The caterer jazzed the tables up with candles.
See also: jazz, up

all that jazz

n. all that stuff; all that nonsense. She told me I was selfish, hateful, rude, ugly, and all that jazz.
See also: all, jazz, that

jazz someone/something up

tv. to make someone or something more exciting or sexy; to make someone or something appeal more to contemporary and youthful tastes. They jazzed up the old girl till she looked like a teenager.
See also: jazz, something, up

jazzed (up)

1. mod. alert; having a positive state of mind. Those guys were jazzed and ready for the game.
2. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Dave was a bit jazzed up, but not terribly.
3. mod. enhanced; with something added; having been made more enticing. It was jazzed enough to have the police chief around asking questions.
4. mod. forged or altered. (see also tinseled.) Better not try to cash a jazzed up check at this bank.
See also: jazz, up

jazzed

verb
See also: jazz
References in periodicals archive ?
A confused Alistair was horrified to be told that the amount of ketamine - the drug Jazzer took - supplied to the veterinary practice has been larger than the amount actually ordered, and the police want to know why.
PHILL JUPITUS takes a detailed look at the multi-faceted life of Elvis Costello - born Declan Patrick MacManus - from punk rocker to classical singer, from mellow jazzer to country artist.
The party in the Bull Upstairs - with Dross providing the music - was going well, until Jazzer was found unconscious in the toilets having taken some drug or other.
These 149 tracks represent a remarkably broad roster of talents reflecting the stylistic developments in jazz over the past six decades, featuring such revered artists as Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell and every other jazzer you've ever heard of.
As well as being a jazzer, Baker has also played with the CBSO, the English Symphony Orchestra and the Birmingham Opera.
Things really build on Friday with more BBC Radio 2-linked stuff, including the rocker turned jazzer Curtis Stigers and the ever-so classy Jane Monheit in the Town Hall, while the similarly glamorous but far more eccentric Koop sit in with the BBC Big Band in the Everyman Theatre.
Jazzer has been funding his habit by a bit of light fingered till work while "helping" behind the bar at The Bull, while Ed found himself on a very bad trip after trying some ketamine - but was it enough to put him off the drug?
Tasteful modern jazzer Bill Frisell has assembled some of the best acoustic players in Music City for his first venture into country music.
He admitted: "When Tommy McLean rang the other day, I immediately remembered a chat I had with Jazzer after he finished playing.
Ed's reaction was to go and smoke cannabis with his wayward friend Jazzer, who then offered him the chance to try "something else".
To do it, stuntman Jazzer Jayes was set on fire no less than 20 TIMES during filming.
Aside from Taylor's pieces, their repertoire also includes works by Argentinian pianist Pablo Ziegler, Welsh jazzer Huw Warren, Israeli reedsman Gilad Atzmon and Goldfrapp's Will Gregory.
Keyboards man Zoot Money may be a jazzer but he sure ain't no rocker - and where the deuce was the tell-tale Johnny Johnson-influenced intro, Mr Lead Guitarist?