jawbone

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diarrhea of the mouth

 and diarrhea of the jawbone
Fig. constant talking; a "disorder" involving constant talking. Wow, does he ever have diarrhea of the mouth! You're getting diarrhea of the jawbone again.
See also: diarrhea, mouth, of

diarrhea of the mouth

and diarrhea of the jawbone
n. an imaginary disease involving constant talking. Wow, does he ever have diarrhea of the mouth! Sorry. I seem to get diarrhea of the jawbone whenever I get in front of an audience.
See also: diarrhea, mouth, of

diarrhea of the jawbone

verb
See also: diarrhea, jawbone, of

jaw(bone)

tv. to try to persuade someone verbally; to apply verbal pressure to someone. They tried to jawbone me into doing it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the two sides of the jawbone are not fused together at the chin.
MyTALK is just a hint of the exciting ways people will be able to breathe life into their Jawbones over time," said Rahman.
We incorporated significant intelligence into the headset and as a result this is the simplest-to-operate Jawbone ever created, with a rich array of design choices to suit any preference or lifestyle.
The company's flagship product, the award-winning Jawbone Bluetooth headset, first disrupted the industry in 2006 with its military-grade NoiseAssassin technology and instantly became recognized as the best Bluetooth headset available.
Jawbone MyTALK is expected to go into public beta soon.
Distribution of Jawbone ICON will soon thereafter expand to Apple, AT&T, Best Buy Mobile and other cellular carrier and retail stores nationwide.
Design and self-expression have been at the core of every generation Jawbone to date, and now we launch an unprecedented suite of choices to match that personal style that makes you who you are," said Yves Behar, Chief Creative Officer of Aliph.
The similarity of the fossilized jawbones and modern-day samples suggests that the parasite was deadly enough to kill infected dinosaurs.
The parasite's modern-day equivalent, which infects birds, eats away at the jawbone and can cause ulcers so severe that the host starves to death.