it's your funeral

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it's (one's) funeral

A (usually humorous) threat indicating that if someone does or doesn't do something, it will bring about negative consequences. OK, fine, don't do what mom said. It's your funeral! If Billy goes in my room when I'm not here, it's his funeral.
See also: funeral

It's your funeral.

Fig. If that is what you are going to do, you will have to endure the dire consequences. Tom: I'm going to call in sick and go to the ball game instead of to work today. Mary: Go ahead. It's your funeral. Bill: I'm going to go into the boss and tell what I really think of him. Sue: It's your funeral.
See also: funeral

it's your funeral

Also, it's or it's not his or her or my or our or their funeral . One must take the consequences of one's destructive or foolish actions. This expression is used to show one's contempt or lack of sympathy for another's actions. For example, Suppose they do get pulled over for taking a joy ride-It's their funeral, or I don't care whether you quit your job-it's not my funeral. This hyperbolic term implies that an action is so bad it will result in death. [Slang; mid-1800s]
See also: funeral

it's your funeral

If you say it's your funeral to someone, you mean that if they suffer bad consequences from something they are planning to do, you will not have any sympathy for them. Have it your own way. You'll be sorry. It's your funeral. My cab driver shrugged his shoulders as if to say, "It's your funeral."
See also: funeral

it’s ˈyour funeral

(informal) used to tell somebody that they, and nobody else, will have to deal with the unpleasant results of their own actions: I think you’re making a big mistake, but if you don’t want to listen to me that’s fine — it’s your funeral.
See also: funeral
References in classic literature ?
Ye may jist say, though (for it's God's thruth), that afore I left hould of the flipper of the spalpeen (which was not till afther her leddyship's futman had kicked us both down the stairs, I giv'd it such a nate little broth of a squaze as made it all up into raspberry jam.
Oh, yes, sir, I get it, and it's good, I'll go and fix it with her.
We can run down there any time, and it's really a pity to trail through the dust in our best bibs and tuckers, when we are tired and cross.
It's a little thing to do, but it gives her pleasure, and I don't believe it will hurt your things half so much as letting dirty dogs and clumping boys spoil them.
I'm a crotchety old thing, and always shall be, but I'm willing to own that you are right, only it's easier for me to risk my life for a person than to be pleasant to him when I don't feel like it.
I'll tell him the papers are at my house, and that it's as much as my life would be worth to let him come while folk were about.
He's a good way beyond sixty, you know; it's much if he gets over it.
Though it's the squire himself as is to blame--making a stupid fellow like that a sort o' man-of-all-work, just to save th' expense of having a proper steward to look after th' estate.
There are such families, it's true, but I am not speaking of them.
The wise guys in the trainin' camps and gyms say it's a good sign for health.
It's funny, but every move they make looks like a tickly kiss.
There ain't necessity enough in this case; and, besides, Jim's a nigger, and wouldn't understand the reasons for it, and how it's the custom in Europe; so we'll let it go.
Well," I says, "if it's in the regulations, and he's got to have it, all right, let him have it; because I don't wish to go back on no regulations; but there's one thing, Tom Sawyer -- if we go to tearing up our sheets to make Jim a rope ladder, we're going to get into trouble with Aunt Sally, just as sure as you're born.
I doubt it's the water got on his brain," said aunt Pullet, turning round from adjusting her cap in a melancholy way at the pier-glass.
talk o' people's complaints till it's quite undecent.