issue

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cloud the issue

To obfuscate or distract from the topic at hand by introducing irrelevant and/or misleading information. Politicians are always clouding the issue during debates by pointing out their opponents' history in other issues. Don't cloud the issue with talk about your past achievements, stick to the question I'm asking you. His muddled explanation only served to cloud the issue further for his students.
See also: cloud, issue

confuse the issue

To obfuscate or distract from the topic at hand by introducing irrelevant and/or misleading information. Politicians are always confusing the issue during debates by pointing out their opponents' history in other issues. Don't confuse the issue with talk about your past achievements, please stick to the question I'm asking you. His muddled explanation only served to confuse the issue further for his students.
See also: confuse, issue

cut to the pith (of something)

To focus directly on the essential or core matter(s) of a given topic or issue. Her newest book cuts to the pith of what it means to be human. We are looking for a reporter who will cut to the pith, not fluff their articles with unnecessary details or asides.
See also: cut, pith

force the issue

To compel a decision, discussion, or confrontation regarding a particular issue or matter at hand. For months my boss has been dragging his feet about increasing my pay, so tomorrow I'm finally going to force the issue with him.
See also: force, issue

get to the heart of (something)

To discover, determine, and/or understand the essential, core, or most important aspect(s) of some issue, problem, or topic at hand. Don't worry ma'am, we'll get to the heart of the matter of your daughter's disappearance. After two hours tinkering with your computer, I think I've gotten to the heart of the problem. Her latest novel really gets to the heart of what it means to be human.
See also: get, heart, of

fudge the issue

To dodge or avoid doing something. The phrase often has a connotation of deceit. The finance department is fudging the issue for now, but once news reaches the CEO, they will have to admit whatever they did to make these figures so impressive. I know you didn't do any of the chores I assigned you, and you can't fudge the issue any longer!
See also: fudge, issue

issue a call for something

to make a public invitation or request for something. The prime minister issued a call for peace. The person who organized the writing contest issued a call for entries.
See also: call, issue

issue (forth) from some place

to go out or come out of a place. The news releases issued forth from the pressroom on a regular basis. Clear water issued from the side of the hill.
See also: issue, place

issue from something

to come out or flow out of something. A delicious perfume issued from Sally's hair as she passed. A wonderful aroma issued from the kitchen as the bread baked.
See also: issue

issue someone with something

to provide someone with something; to distribute something to someone. We issued them with the clothes they needed for the trip. Everyone was issued with supplies.
See also: issue

issue something as something

to release or send out something as something. They issued this month's magazine as a special double issue. The publisher issued this month's magazine as the very last one.
See also: issue

issue something to someone

to distribute or dispense something to someone. The front office issued new assignments to everyone today. New keys were issued to everyone.
See also: issue

make a point of someone or something

 and make an issue of someone or something
Fig. to turn someone or something into an important matter. Please don't make a point of John's comment. It wasn't that important. I hope you make an issue of Tom's success and the reasons for it.
See also: make, of, point

take issue with someone

to argue with someone. I heard your last statement and I have to take issue with you. Tom took issue with Maggie about the cost of the house.
See also: issue, take

take issue with something

to disagree with or argue about something. I have to take issue with that statement. I want to take issue with the last statement you made.
See also: issue, take

at issue

(slightly formal)
1. not decided At issue is whether Linda broke state law by secretly taping conversations.
2. in disagreement What is at issue is how the organization spends its money.
See also: issue

take issue with somebody

to disagree with someone or something I take issue with people who say it is unpatriotic to criticize our government. Thorogood took issue with the story that he had a drinking problem, calling it a nasty rumor.
See also: issue, take

make a point of doing something

to be certain to do something that you think is important She makes a point of sending thank-you notes.
See also: make, of, point

at issue

1. In question, under discussion; also, to be decided. For example, Who will pay for the refreshments was the point at issue. [Early 1800s]
2. In conflict, in disagreement, as in Physicians are still at issue over the appropriate use of hormone therapy. This usage, from legal terminology, was defined by Sir William Blackstone ( Commentaries on the Laws of England, 1768), who said that when a point is affirmed by one side and denied by the other, "they are then said to be at issue."
See also: issue

make a point of

Treat something as important or essential, as in She made a point of thanking everyone in the department for their efforts. This expression uses point in the sense of "an objective or purpose." [Late 1700s] Also see make one's point.
See also: make, of, point

take issue with

Disagree with, as in I take issue with those figures; they don't include last month's sales. This idiom comes from legal terminology, where it was originally put as to join issue, meaning "take the opposite side of a case." [Late 1600s]
See also: issue, take

dead issue

n. an issue that doesn’t matter anymore. It’s a dead issue. Forget it.
See also: dead, issue

issue

n. problem. (In colloquial use, issue has virtually replaced the word problem. It is even heard in a few idioms such as Do you have an issue with that?) I had an issue with my car this morning. It wouldn’t start. You are late again! Do you have an issue with our office hours?

at issue

1. In question; in dispute: "Many people fail to grasp what is really at issue here" (Gail Sheehy).
2. At variance; in disagreement.
See also: issue

join issue

1. To enter into controversy.
2. Law To submit an issue for decision.
See also: issue, join

take issue

To take an opposing point of view; disagree.
See also: issue, take

make a point of

To consider or treat (an action or activity) as indispensable: made a point of visiting their niece on the way home.
See also: make, of, point
References in periodicals archive ?
Also chaired the NAIC task force addressing legal issues arising from the terrorist attacks on Sept.
Issues in a taxpayer's case designated for litigation;
with Congressional staff and industry experts to discuss legislation and timely issues the members are dealing with in the workplace.
The task force concluded that because most issues identified by IRS examiners (particularly within the LMSB Division) affect more than one taxpayer, IRS personnel have used the TAM process as more than a vehicle for resolving issues in specific cases.
With the exception of Wiredu's study of the epistemological issue of truth, all of the other articles in African Philosophy focus on related issues in metaphysics.
Since 1990, however, a substantial body of literature has been published that addresses career counseling with lesbian and gay persons (Pope, 1995c), but very little of the past or recent career counseling literature regarding gay men and lesbian women has addressed the issues of nondominant racial or ethnic groups (Chung & Katayama, 1998; Pope & Chung, 2000).
They agree on using public money to pay for abortions and abortion clinics; they agree on providing benefits to homosexual couples; they agree on re-defining marriage to include any two people of any sex; they agree on what type of sex education to enforce in schools and promote contraception; they agree on the over-the counter sale of the "morning after" pill; and they are probably going to agree on the thrust of the left-lib, homosexual agenda for "advancing" these issues even further.
It is essential to acknowledge that there is no single Christian position on the moral issues surrounding sexual orientation.
Such evaluation will deal with the following issues: the attention given to the environment in the AHDR, the AHDR's environmental paradigm, the analytical value of the AHDR, the comprehensiveness of the issues outlined in the AHDR, the strategies advocated in the AHDR, and it will finally refer to the question of the environment within the framework of the Middle East peace process, a dimension which was bypassed in the AHDR.
And these hot-button issues are just the latest ones to spark a review of whether certain topics belong in the classroom.
Reading these early issues, one gets a clear sense of the urgency felt by the editors as they struggled to report on the cultural developments rapidly unfolding before them.
Although the nation has focused primarily on terrorism/homeland security/defense policy during the past ten months, pre 9/11 domestic issues are central to the 2002 elections.
There are several issues awaiting Commission action that are so far in the staff preparation stage.
Regular columns focus on important legislative issues, research, and sports nutrition.
The basic comp copy offer is worded as "Send me my FREE issue and, if I like it, I'll receive 11 more issues for the low introductory price of $16.