Irish


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Irish: Irish language

get (someone's) Irish up

To become or cause to become angry, hostile, defensive, or irritable. John got his Irish up when his parents brought up the subject of college. Election season always gets my dad's Irish up.
See also: get, Irish, up

get someone's dander up

 and get someone's back up; get someone's hackles up; get someone's Irish up; put someone's back up
Fig. to make someone get angry. (Fixed order.) Now, don't get your dander up. Calm down. I insulted him and really got his hackles up. Bob had his Irish up all day yesterday. I don't know what was wrong. Now, now, don't get your back up. I didn't mean any harm.
See also: dander, get, up

luck of the Irish

luck associated with the Irish people. (Also said as a catch phrase for any kind of luck.) Bill: How did you manage to do it, Jeff. Jeff: It's the luck of the Irish, I guess.
See also: Irish, luck, of

luck of the devil

Also, luck of the Irish. Extraordinarily good fortune, as in You've the luck of the devil-that ball landed just on the line, or Winning the lottery-that's the luck of the Irish. These superstitious attributions of good fortune date from the first half of the 1900s.
See also: devil, luck, of
References in classic literature ?
Boys, 'tis what he's been driving at these six months - our superior corp'ril with his education and his copies of the Irish papers and his everlasting beer.
They cursed the Queen, they mourned over Ireland, they suggested hideous plunder of the Indian country-side, and then, alas - some of the younger men would go forth and wallow on the ground in spasms of wicked laughter The genius of the Irish for conspiracies is remarkable.
Wilson is a Londoner," said the Irish detective, with a smile.
Nolan, the Irish policeman, had also fallen, sprawling all his great length in the grass, and it was red with his blood.
He said that was the advantage of Irish stew: you got rid of such a lot of things.
A little Irish girl of my own age had been paired off with me.
So it comes about that in old Scottish and in old Irish manuscripts we find the same stories.
And when the petition had been read and was about to be adopted, there came forward the Irish member (who was a young gentleman of ardent temperament,) with such a speech as only an Irish member can make, breathing the true soul and spirit of poetry, and poured forth with such fervour, that it made one warm to look at him; in the course whereof, he told them how he would demand the extension of that great boon to his native country; how he would claim for her equal rights in the muffin laws as in all other laws; and how he yet hoped to see the day when crumpets should be toasted in her lowly cabins, and muffin bells should ring in her rich green valleys.
This was in the Northern, Anglian, kingdom of Northumbria (Yorkshire and Southern Scotland), which, as we have already said, had then won the political supremacy, and whose monasteries and capital city, York, thanks to the Irish missionaries, had become the chief centers of learning and culture in Western Christian Europe.
The Irish officer stood up disordered and defiant on the threshold.
Containing the arrival of an Irish gentleman, with very extraordinary adventures which ensued at the inn.
The Irish servant-lass rushed up from the kitchen and smiled a "God bless you.
On this course nine obstacles had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race was just facing the pavilion.
An involuntary grunt came from the victim, who turned his head, showing sun-reddened blond skin and unmistakable angry Irish eyes.
If I might make so bold as to defend that extravagant conception, Mr Merdle, I would hint that it originated after the Railroad-share epoch, in the times of a certain Irish bank, and of one or two other equally laudable enterprises.