intrude

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Related to intrudes: intrusiveness

intrude into something

to get involved in something that is someone else's business. I don't want to intrude into your affairs, but I see that you're short of money. Please don't intrude into this matter.
See also: intrude

intrude oneself into something

to work oneself into some matter that is someone else's business. I hate to intrude myself into your conversation, but don't I know you? Please do not intrude yourself into this matter.
See also: intrude

intrude (up)on someone or something

to encroach on someone or something or matters that concern only someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) I didn't mean to intrude upon you. Please don't intrude on our meeting. Please wait outside.
See also: intrude, on
References in classic literature ?
But we do not wish to intrude, I assure you," the Wizard hastened to say.
No sooner had he crossed the border of this domain when two guards seized him and carried him before the Grand Gallipoot of the Growleywogs, who scowled upon him ferociously and asked him why he dared intrude upon his territory.
I am very much obliged," he said, "but I will not intrude upon you further.
Sir Patrick, speaking for himself, places his sister-in-law's view and his niece's view, side by side, before the lady whom he has now the honor of addressing, and on whose confidence he is especially careful not to intrude.
They would have none to witness their labours and intrude on their hopes, but the aged stones and grand old oaks.
And now, sir, I'll not intrude further upon your time.
I am the last man to intrude into a sphere for which I am so entirely unfitted.
An extruded rubber member having a cross-section in which a portion of a second unvulcanized rubber intrudes between portions of a first unvulcanized rubber is formed by extrusion.
Less a character than a dea ex machina, Amber ruthlessly intrudes upon the family.
In Tumlir's essay titled "Uta Barth: Figures of Stasis and Flux," he writes, "By purging her pictures of their ostensible subjects, [Barth] has sought to redirect our attention to a kind of perceptual noise, that which intrudes all around: in the setting, the outlying objects, the air.