introduce

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Related to introduced: thesaurus

introduce the shoemaker to the tailor

To kick someone in the buttocks. Primarily heard in UK. If you don't leave me alone, I'll introduce the shoemaker to the tailor!
See also: introduce, tailor

I would like you to meet someone.

 and I would like to introduce you to someone.
an expression used to introduce one person to another. (The word someone can be used as the someone.) Mary: I would like you to meet my Uncle Bill. Sally: Hello, Uncle Bill. Nice to meet you. Tom: I would like to introduce you to Bill Franklin. John: Hello, Bill. Glad to meet you. Bill: Glad to meet you, John.
See also: like, meet

introduce someone into something

to bring someone into something; to launch someone into something. Tony introduced Wally into his club. You do not wish me to introduce myself into local social life, do you?
See also: introduce

introduce someone to someone

to make someone acquainted with someone else. I would like to introduce you to my cousin, Rudolph. Allow me to introduce myself to you.
See also: introduce

introduce something into something

to bring something into something or some place; to bring something into something as an innovation. The decorator introduced a little bit of bright red into the conference room. After I introduced the new procedures into the factory, production increased enormously.
See also: introduce

let me (just) say

 and just let me say
a phrase introducing something that the speaker thinks is important. Rachel: Let me say how pleased we all are with your efforts. Henry: Why, thank you very much. Bob: Just let me say that we're extremely pleased with your activity. Bill: Thanks loads. I did what I could.
See also: let, say

to put it another way

 and put another way
a phrase introducing a restatement of what someone, usually the speaker, has just said. Father: You're still very young, Tom. To put it another way, you don't have any idea about what you're getting into. John: Could you go back to your own room now, Tom? I have to study. Put another way, get out of here! Tom: Okay, okay. Don't get your bowels in an uproar!
See also: another, put, way
References in classic literature ?
Dashwood attended them down stairs, was introduced to Mrs.
All those minute circumstances belonging to private life and domestic character, all that gives verisimilitude to a narrative, and individuality to the persons introduced, is still known and remembered in Scotland; whereas in England, civilisation has been so long complete, that our ideas of our ancestors are only to be gleaned from musty records and chronicles, the authors of which seem perversely to have conspired to suppress in their narratives all interesting details, in order to find room for flowers of monkish eloquence, or trite reflections upon morals.
As every person called up made exactly the same appearance he had done in the world, it gave me melancholy reflections to observe how much the race of human kind was degenerated among us within these hundred years past; how the pox, under all its consequences and denominations had altered every lineament of an English countenance; shortened the size of bodies, unbraced the nerves, relaxed the sinews and muscles, introduced a sallow complexion, and rendered the flesh loose and rancid.
He had introduced himself to some tenants whom he had never seen before; he had begun making acquaintance with cottages whose very existence, though on his own estate, had been hitherto unknown to him.
After some time they received an offer of tea from one of their neighbours; it was thankfully accepted, and this introduced a light conversation with the gentleman who offered it, which was the only time that anybody spoke to them during the evening, till they were discovered and joined by Mr.
There are also some other forms of government, which have been proposed either by private persons, or philosophers, or politicians, all of which come much nearer to those which have been really established, or now exist, than these two of Plato's; for neither have they introduced the innovation of a community of wives and children, and public tables for the women, but have been contented to set out with establishing such rules as are absolutely necessary.
It is not without melancholy that I wander among my recollections of the world of letters in London when first, bashful but eager, I was introduced to it.
The bewildered Gania introduced her first to Varia, and both women, before shaking hands, exchanged looks of strange import.
But even admitting as correct all the cunningly devised arguments with which these histories are filled- admitting that nations are governed by some undefined force called an idea- history's essential question still remains unanswered, and to the former power of monarchs and to the influence of advisers and other people introduced by the universal historians, another, newer force- the idea- is added, the connection of which with the masses needs explanation.
The reader travelling in Italy, or Belgium perhaps, has doubtless visited one or more of those spacious sacristies, introduced to which for the inspection of some more than usually recherche work of art, one is presently dominated by their reverend quiet: simple people coming and going there, devout, or at least on devout business, with half-pitched voices, not without touches of kindly humour, in what seems to express like a picture the most genial side, midway between the altar and the home, of the ecclesiastical life.
Princess Ozma, whom I love as much as my readers do, is again introduced in this story, and so are several of our old friends of Oz.
declared Scraps, and would have said more on the subject had not the door opened to admit a little Horner man whom the Chief introduced as Diksey.
Sir Jervis introduced himself--and, more wonderful still, he invited me to his house at our first interview.
A GREAT Philanthropist who had thought of himself in connection with the Presidency and had introduced a bill into Congress requiring the Government to loan every voter all the money that he needed, on his personal security, was explaining to a Sunday-school at a railway station how much he had done for the country, when an angel looked down from Heaven and wept.
In all England you could not have picked out a person more essentially unfit to be introduced to a lady--to a young lady especially--than Dexter.