interest


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to interest: simple interest

in the interest of justice

In order to be just or fair. You broke the law and, in the interest of justice, I must punish you accordingly.
See also: interest, justice, of

rooting interest

A strong desire to support a particular person or group. Primarily heard in US. My brother is a huge sports fan and has a rooting interest in all our local teams. I have a rooting interest in that candidate and am going to be campaigning for her.
See also: interest, root

draw interest

1. To attract attention. In this usage, "draw" and "interest" are often separated by a quantifier. In the employee poll, these potential changes drew the most interest, sir. That artist's latest set of paintings has really drawn a great deal of interest among art collectors.
2. To accrue interest while deposited, as of money. You'll only be able to draw interest if you actually deposit your money for a change.
See also: draw, interest

draw interest

 
1. to appear interesting and get (someone's) attention. (Note the variation in the examples.) This kind of event isn't likely to draw a lot of interest. What kind of show will draw public interest?
2. [for money] to earn interest while on deposit. Put your money in the bank so it will draw interest. The cash value of some insurance policies also draws interest.
See also: draw, interest

have a keen interest in something

to have a strong interest in something; to be very interested in something. Tom had always had a keen interest in music, so he started a band. The children have a keen interest in having apet, so I bought them a cat.
See also: have, interest, keen

have someone's best interest(s) at heart

to make decisions based on someone's best interests. I know she was only doing what would benefit her, but she said she had my best interests at heart.
See also: have, heart, interest

in one's (own) (best) interest(s)

to one's advantage; as a benefit to oneself. It is not in your own interests to share your ideas with Jack. He will say that they are his. Jane thought it was in the best interest of her friend to tell his mother about his illness.
See also: interest

in the interest of saving time

in order to hurry things along; in order to save time. Mary: In the interest of saving time, I'd like to save questions for the end of my talk. Bill: But I have an important question now! "In the interest of saving time," said Jane, "I'll give you the first three answers."
See also: interest, of, saving, time

in the interest of someone or something

as an advantage or benefit to someone or something; in order to advance or improve someone or something. In the interest of health, people are asked not to smoke. The police imprisoned the suspects in the interest of the safety of the public.
See also: interest, of

interest someone in someone or something

to arouse the interest of someone in someone or something. Yes, lean recommend someone for you to hire. Could I interest you in Tom? He's one of our best workers. Can I interest you in checking out a book from the library?
See also: interest

interest someone in something

to cause someone to wish to purchase something. Could I interest you in something with a little more style to it? Can I interest you in some additional insurance on your life?
See also: interest

of interest (to someone)

interesting to someone. These archived files are no longer of any interest. This is of little interest to me.
See also: interest, of

pique someone's curiosity

 and pique someone's interest
to arouse interest; to arouse curiosity. The advertisement piqued my curiosity about the product. The professor tried to pique the students' interest in French literature.
See also: curiosity, pique

take an interest in someone or something

to become concerned or interested in someone or something. Do you take an interest in your children? You should take an interest in everything your child does.
See also: interest, take

*vested interest (in something)

Fig. a personal or biased interest, often financial, in something. (*Typically: have ~; give someone ~.) Margaret has a vested interest in wanting her father to sell the family firm. She has shares in it and would make a large profit. Bob has a vested interest in keeping the village traffic-free. He has a summer home there.
See also: interest, vested

in one's interest

Also, in the interest of one; in one's own interest; in one's best interest. For one's benefit or advantage, as in It's obviously in their interest to increase profits, or Is this policy in the interest of the townspeople? or I suspect it's in your own best interest to quit now. [Early 1700s]
See also: interest

take an interest

1. Be concerned or curious, as in She really takes an interest in foreign affairs, or I wish he'd take an interest in classical music.
2. Share in a right to or ownership of property or a business, as in He promised to take an interest in the company as soon as he could afford to.
See also: interest, take

vested interest

A personal stake in something, as in She has a vested interest in keeping the house in her name. This term, first recorded in 1818, uses vested in the sense of "established" or "secured."
See also: interest, vested

with interest

With more than what one should receive, extra, and then some. For example, Mary borrowed Jane's new dress without asking, but Jane paid her back with interest-she drove off in Mary's car . This idiom alludes to interest in the financial sense. Its figurative use dates from the late 1500s.
See also: interest

declare an (or your) interest

make known your financial interests in an undertaking before it is discussed.
See also: declare, interest

conflict of ˈinterest(s)

a situation in which there are two jobs, aims, roles, etc. and it is not possible for both of them to be treated equally and fairly at the same time: There was a conflict of interest between his business dealings and his political activities.
See also: conflict, interest, of

in the interest(s) of something

in order to help or achieve something: In the interests of safety, smoking is forbidden.
See also: interest, of, something

pay something back/return something with ˈinterest

react to the harm somebody has done to you by doing something even worse to them: Peter pushed his sister, so she paid him back with interest by kicking him hard.
Interest is the extra money you receive or pay when you lend or borrow money.

have somebody’s (best) interests at ˈheart

want somebody to be happy and successful even though your actions may not show this: As a father, he always had his little girl’s best interests at heart.
See also: have, heart, interest

ˌpique somebody’s ˈinterest, curiˈosity, etc.

(especially American English) make somebody very interested in something: The programme has certainly piqued public interest in this rare bird.
See also: pique

have a vested ˈinterest (in something)

have a personal reason for wanting something to happen, especially because you get some advantage from it: He has a vested interest in Mona leaving the firm (= perhaps because he may get her job).
See also: have, interest, vested

interest in

v.
To arouse in someone a curiosity about, or a desire for, doing or acquiring something: The clerk interested the customer in a new refrigerator. I am interested in French literature.
See also: interest
References in periodicals archive ?
33) For taxation years beginning after 2002 and before October 30, 2003, an exempt interest includes all participating interests in qualifying entities.
Finally, recent new loans issued to purchase a cooperative interest that have already closed after July 1, 2001 are affected.
In summary, the Federal Reserve Board strongly supports legislative proposals to authorize the payment of interest on demand deposits and on balances held by depository institutions at Reserve Banks, as well as increased flexibility in the setting of reserve requirements.
7) The taxpayers' appraiser valued a 1% LP interest at $89,505, the Service's expert at $150,665.
Household interest income would then revive and consumption start to rebound.
Significantly, Notice 2005-43 and the proposed regulations eliminate the different tax treatments for the issuance of profits and capital interests.
The case law is far from uniform on the applicability of the common interest doctrine to communications among insurers and their reinsurers.
Conflict of interest policies should require that all conflicts of interest of individual physicians, physician leaders, nonphysician leaders and board members be reported regularly.
The agreement may define the fair market value of the decedent's interest for estate tax purposes.
Most of the loans have a life of seven years and interest rate caps that range from 2.
Where questionnaire items that were categorized as indicating interest or difficulty were reversed, the items were recoded to reflect the opposite score.
7) Strategic Interest Group seminars at IABC International Conference
Despite its relative advantages both in measuring price volatility and in providing assistance for reducing the interest rate risk of a fixed-income portfolio, duration receives little coverage.
With Notice 2006-93 providing guidance on the 2006 Form 1099-INT, Interest Income, requirements for reporting exempt interest and exempt-interest dividends, the IRS has offered tenuous relief from reporting procedures.
Full browser ?