intent

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avowed intent

A solemn public promise or pledge toward some goal or achievement. The presidential nominee gave her avowed intent to reform the public school system should she be elected.
See also: intent

for all intents and purposes

Cliché seeming as if; looking as if. Tom stood there, looking, for all intents and purposes, as if he could strangle Sally, but, being the gentleman that he is, he just glowered. Mary: Is the car washed now? John: For all intents and purposes, yes, but I didn't dry it yet.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on doing something

determined to do something. The children were intent on making a snowman. The prisoner was intent on escaping.
See also: intent, on

intent on doing something

determined to do something She seems intent on specializing in family law.
See also: intent, on

for all intents and purposes

also to all intents and purposes
almost completely pretty much Escape from that prison was, for all intents and purposes, impossible. A licensed physician's assistant is to all intents and purposes a doctor.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

in all the most important ways We've got a few odd things to finish, but to all intents and purposes the job is done. They redesigned the old model and created something which was to all intents and purposes a brand new car.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

Also, for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes. In every practical sense, virtually. For example, For all intents and purposes the case is closed, or For all practical purposes the Vice-President is the chief executive while the President is in the hospital . The first phrase, dating from the 1500s, originated in English law, where it was to all intents, constructions, and purposes. A shorter synonym is in effect, def. 1.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose
References in periodicals archive ?
What was originally a jokey format is well on its way to becoming--like "I support him 110%"--a minimum unit of conversational currency, beneath which intentness is insufficiently over-conveyed.
I did not see God's purpose, I only saw his intentness and his entire relentlessness toward his means.
Although the statuesque Virgin's attention is divided by her care to hold Jesus steady as He stands on her knee, she listens, with brown-eyed intentness, to her voluble cousin St Elizabeth, as does St Joseph, who is all amiability.
There is in Swinburne this childlike persistency, this intentness towards an opposite, and this evenly maintained tapping of a sinister, but familiar, source; this, to the onlooker, all-but-heartbreaking pursuit of the remorselessly magical and effortlessly patient replications of an aristocratically perceived nature whose patterns (like the taint of the D'Urbervilles, and Tess's murderous ace of hearts) are finite, and recognized (though never comprehended).
Her wide-apart eyes looked his way with unseeing intentness.
As O then settles, with both dejection and apprehension, into dozing off and rocking in a chair (that has two additional watching eyes in its headrest), E's face, which is O's "but with [a] very different expression, impossible to describe, neither severity nor benignity, but rather acute intentness (47)," purposely moves out of the angle of the safety zone to confront O with a direct and aggressive gaze.
The Indian gazed at the house, with that fierce intentness which sometimes glared, in a manner that had got to be, in its ordinary aspects, dull and besotted.
To quote North himself, music was not simply a favorite enjoyment, a "companion, and delight in all my solitudes as well as societys," but something much more, a congenial and challenging medium for his wide-ranging investigations of natural phenomena: "and as I ever bent my thoughts with more than ordinary intentness to search of truth in the way of physicks, it could not be expected, but I should take in my darling, as a subject to work upon" (quotations from Cursory Notes of Musicke, p.
Then, with great intentness, he says, "But it all wasn't a rosy picture by any means.
5 Giardini (Steve McQueen) Traduced as obvious and "phoned-in," but much the opposite: an isola of aesthetic intentness in a wan and soukish Venice Biennale.