instance

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at the instance of

At one's urging. I'm doing some charity work now at the instance of my college advisor.
See also: instance, of

for instance

for example. I've lived in many cities, for instance, Boston, Chicago, and Detroit. Jane is very generous. For instance, she volunteers at the hospital and gives money to charities.
See also: instance

in the first place and in the first instance

initially; to begin with. In the first place, you don't have enough money to buy one. In the second place, you don't need one. In the first instance, I don't have the time. In the second place, I'm not interested.
See also: and, first, instance, place

for example

Also, for instance. As an illustration of something, as in Dress casually, in blue jeans, for example, or This program has problems-for instance, it's hard to retrieve lost data. The first expression, which dates from the late 1500s, is used throughout this book to illustrate how an idiom is used. The variant dates from the mid-1600s.
See also: example

instance

see under for example.

for example

As an illustrative instance: Wear something simple; for example, a skirt and blouse.
See also: example

for instance

As an example; for example.
See also: instance
References in classic literature ?
Men of this class, whether the favorites of a king or of a people, have in too many instances abused the confidence they possessed; and assuming the pretext of some public motive, have not scrupled to sacrifice the national tranquillity to personal advantage or personal gratification.
Has not the spirit of commerce, in many instances, administered new incentives to the appetite, both for the one and for the other?
Few nations, nevertheless, have been more frequently engaged in war; and the wars in which that kingdom has been engaged have, in numerous instances, proceeded from the people.
They had seen, in a variety of instances, assumptions by Congress, not only of recommendatory, but of operative, powers, warranted, in the public estimation, by occasions and objects infinitely less urgent than those by which their conduct was to be governed.
The sum of what has been here advanced and proved is, that the charge against the convention of exceeding their powers, except in one instance little urged by the objectors, has no foundation to support it; that if they had exceeded their powers, they were not only warranted, but required, as the confidential servants of their country, by the circumstances in which they were placed, to exercise the liberty which they assume; and that finally, if they had violated both their powers and their obligations, in proposing a Constitution, this ought nevertheless to be embraced, if it be calculated to accomplish the views and happiness of the people of America.
Substance, in the truest and primary and most definite sense of the word, is that which is neither predicable of a subject nor present in a subject; for instance, the individual man or horse.
For instance, 'man' is predicted of the individual man.
Of course there can be no exact parallel between arts so different as architecture and poetic composition: But certainly in the poetry of our day also, though it has been in some instances powerfully initiative and original, there is great scholarship, a large comparative acquaintance with the poetic methods of earlier workmen, and a very subtle intelligence of their charm.
Take, for an instance, this description of high-northern summer:--
I may add, that as some organisms will breed most freely under the most unnatural conditions (for instance, the rabbit and ferret kept in hutches), showing that their reproductive system has not been thus affected; so will some animals and plants withstand domestication or cultivation, and vary very slightly--perhaps hardly more than in a state of nature.
The great and inherited development of the udders in cows and goats in countries where they are habitually milked, in comparison with the state of these organs in other countries, is another instance of the effect of use.
The instances of a word shade off into other movements by imperceptible degrees.
Napoleon is a complicated series of occurrences, bound together by causal laws, not, like instances of a word, by similarities.
The captain, at Mr Allworthy's instance, was outwardly, as we have said, reconciled to his brother; yet the same rancour remained in his heart; and he found so many opportunities of giving him private hints of this, that the house at last grew insupportable to the poor doctor; and he chose rather to submit to any inconveniences which he might encounter in the world, than longer to bear these cruel and ungrateful insults from a brother for whom he had done so much.
The doctor went directly to London, where he died soon after of a broken heart; a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined, and would have a fair title to a place in the bill of mortality, did it not differ in one instance from all other diseases--viz.