ingratiate

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ingratiate oneself into something

to work hard to bring oneself into the favor of someone. Oh, how he fawns over the guests! Isn't it terrible the way he tries to ingratiate himself into their favor? You will never succeed in ingratiating yourself into my good graces.
See also: ingratiate

ingratiate oneself with someone

to work oneself into someone's favor. Why do you have to ingratiate yourself with everyone? Don't you know how to be just plain friends? She was very obvious in her effort to ingratiate herself with the boss.
See also: ingratiate
References in periodicals archive ?
1995) recently expanded the studies performed by Jones and his colleagues by using "live" student interactions and more subtle and varied ingratiatory tactics.
Hypothesis 1: Co-worker responses in environments in which subordinate ingratiatory behavior directed at the supervisor appears to be rewarded will be more negative than co-worker responses in environments in which no ingratiation is present or in which ingratiation does not appear to be rewarded.
The question of which particular factors cause ingratiatory behaviors to be perceived as a threat to the co-worker's well-being remains unanswered.
Conversely, individuals low in self-efficacy may perceive little control over their inputs, regardless of whether the inputs are specifically task-related or not, and therefore exhibit little reaction to ingratiatory behavior of a co-worker.
Hypothesis 2: Co-workers higher in self efficacy who are exposed to ingratiation attempts will perceive more favoritism and react more negatively to the work session, supervisor, and ingratiatory co-worker than co-workers with lower self efficacy.
Hypothesis 3: Co-workers with a stronger PWE who are exposed to ingratiation attempts will perceive more favoritism and react more negatively to the work session, supervisor, and ingratiatory co-worker than coworkers with a less strong PWE.
Only two studies have examined coworkers' responses to ingratiatory behavior.
Specifically, ingratiatory behavior may provide observing coworkers with cues about the work environment and the ingratiator.
Thus, ingratiatory behavior, in comparison to other influence tactics such as entitlements, may be more likely to result in positive reactions because it may be more difficult to detect the ingratiator's ulterior motive.
Hypothesis 1: Subordinate ingratiatory behaviors directed at the supervisor will result in more positive coworker reactions to the workplace in terms of supervisor and coworker satisfaction and perceptions of fairness than when no ingratiatory behaviors are observed.
Two important situational factors that may influence coworkers' responses to subordinate ingratiatory behaviors directed at the supervisor are the coworkers' objective level of performance in comparison to that of the ingratiator and whether or not the ingratiator actually receives desirable rewards following the ingratiation attempt.
Hypothesis 2: Coworker responses to ingratiatory behaviors directed at the supervisor will be influenced by objective performance level and supervisor reward decisions.