in vogue


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*in vogue

fashionable; faddish. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) This style of coat is no longer in vogue. That word isn't in vogue any longer.
References in classic literature ?
But indeed, at that time, putting to death was a recipe much in vogue with all trades and professions, and not least of all with Tellson's.
Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
After closely examining the dial and observing that it was nearly twelve o'clock, I opened it at the back and was interested to observe an inner case of ivory, upon which was painted a miniature portrait in that exquisite and delicate manner which was in vogue during the eighteenth century.
She is discussed by her dear friends with all the genteelest slang in vogue, with the last new word, the last new manner, the last new drawl, and the perfection of polite indifference.
Another early favorite (for we must remember that Rebecca's only knowledge of the great world of poetry consisted of the selections in vogue in school readers) was:--
Gascoigne's mind seemed to run on political topics, but whether relating to the past, present, or future, could not easily be determined, since the same ideas and phrases have been in vogue these fifty years.
Adroitly D'Arnot led the conversation from point to point until the policeman had explained to the interested Tarzan many of the methods in vogue for apprehending and identifying criminals.
Peter's recitation was one greatly in vogue at that time, beginning,