in time


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in time

(with something) Go to in step (with something).
See also: time

in time (for something)

also in time to do something
before it is too late I'm glad you made it in time. He planned to arrive in time to have dinner with his sister. I hope she gets here in time to see the show's opening number.
Usage notes: often used in the form just in time (almost too late): He was just in time for his flight.
See also: time

in time

1. Before a time limit expires, early enough, as in His speech begins at eight, so we've arrived in time. It is often put as in time for, as in Please come in time for dinner. [Second half of 1400s] Also see in good time.
2. Eventually, within an indefinite period, as in In time you'll see that Dad was right. [c. 1450] Also see in due course.
3. In the proper musical tempo or rhythm, as in It's important to dance in time to the music. [c. 1700]
See also: time

in time

1. Before a time limit expires.
2. Within an indefinite time; eventually: In time they came to accept the harsh facts.
3. Music
a. In the proper tempo.
b. Played with a meter.
See also: time
References in classic literature ?
If it is travelling through time fifty times or a hundred times faster than we are, if it gets through a minute while we get through a second, the impression it creates will of course be only one-fiftieth or one-hundredth of what it would make if it were not travelling in time.
I should be most thankful if you could get me there in time, and will gladly pay you an extra fare.
I'll do all that can be done, sir," said Jerry; "I think we shall be in time.
we are in time," said the young man, "and thank you, too, my friend, and your good horse.
He spread it all over the place how he had seen them on moonlight nights sitting together in the dingle, drinking champagne, and laughing and talking as merry as you please; and, of course, it came in time to Sir William--"
But I have also seen his eyes rest fondly upon the faces in the room, upon the pictures on the wall, upon all the familiar objects of that home, whose abiding and clear image must have flashed often on his memory in times of stress and anxiety at sea.
Isolation, he says, "is an appropriate and recognized process in a detention environment, especially if you have an individual who is a subject of an ongoing criminal investigation, and all these individuals are, or were at some point in time, the subject of a terrorist investigation.