in the strict(est) sense

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in the strict(est) sense

Following the narrowest and most precise interpretation (of something). While not correct in the strictest sense, the word has been widely accepted among most English speakers. I wouldn't call her a socialist in the strict sense, but some of her beliefs definitely lean that way.
See also: sense
References in classic literature ?
It was a purely disinterested operation in the strictest sense of the term, and offered not the slightest chance of profit.
The black card was introduced to cut down on cynical play and rolling out the rule in the strictest sense would have been a huge statement in that instance.
As per Vale Park contracts manager Tom Perks, "This will not be demolition in the strictest sense of the word.
Eddie is a purist in the strictest sense of the word.
No, it's a thank you letter to the anonymous person - I will call him a gentleman because, in the strictest sense of the word, that's exactly what he is - who offered to help while I was trying to change a wheel on my car.
Players are in the strictest sense of the phrase the role models, not only of the young generations, but of all people because they are public property so to speak.
They may not be professional artists in the strictest sense of the word, but the work is of high quality.
Of course, most of them also insisted that their films this summer aren't, in the strictest sense, remakes.
In the strictest sense it is not possible to conduct The Grocer 33 in a discount chain such as Lidl, because it offers a range of tertiary brands as alternatives to leading brands and own label offerings.
Not denial in the strictest sense, nor is it escapism.
Perhaps it isn't a partnership in the strictest sense, but these performers do rely on the biz world to fund their art, and have found moneymaking jobs that are meaningful, satisfying and easier on the body than waiting tables.
Cheri, with a more secular bent, "regarded welfare as an entitlement in the strictest sense of the word.
This temporal division is reasonable and enjoys fairly wide acceptance, even if some classicists are accustomed to distinguish classical Latin prose in the strictest sense, which denotes the period of Cicero and Caesar, from the first two centuries A.
There is no make-believe here, but reality in the strictest sense of the word.
In the strictest sense, very few new CPAs are required each year.