in other words


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in other words

A phrase used to indicate that one is about to restate something in a different way, typically to clarify or simplify it. A number of factors have combined to obfuscate a reliable assessment of the situation. In other words, we don't know what we don't know. A: "It will be a challenge to make the playoffs at this point." B: "In other words, we're all but out of it."
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in other words

a phrase introducing a restatement of what has just been said. Henry: Sure I want to do it, but how much do I get paid? Andrew: In other words, you're just doing it for the money. Bill: Well, I suppose I really should prepare my entourage for departure. Bob: In other words, you're leaving? Bill: One could say that, I suppose. Bob: Why didn't one?
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in other words

Putting it differently, usually more simply or explicitly. For example, The weather was terrible, the plane took off several hours after the scheduled time, and then fog prevented their landing-in other words, they never got to the wedding at all . [Mid-1800s]
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in ˈother words

expressed in a different way; that is to say: ‘I don’t think this is the right job for you, Pete.’ ‘In other words, you want me to leave. Is that it?’
See also: other, word