in for a penny, in for a pound

In for a penny

If one has committed to doing something, one will or should do it completely, and not spare any effort. A shortening of the phrase "in for a penny, in for a pound." We can't turn in a half-finished report, so we need to stay up all night and get it done. In for a penny, in for a pound.
See also: penny

in for a penny, in for a pound

If one has committed to doing something, one will or should do it completely, and not spare any effort. We can't turn in a half-finished report, so we need to stay up all night and get it done. In for a penny, in for a pound.
See also: pound

in for a penny, in for a pound

Once involved, one must not stop at half-measures. For example, All right, I'll drive you all the way there-in for a penny, in for a pound. This term originally meant that if one owes a penny one might as well owe a pound, and came into American use without changing the British monetary unit to dollar. [Late 1600s] For a synonym, see hanged for a sheep.
See also: pound

in for a penny, in for a pound

mainly BRITISH
You say in for a penny, in for a pound to show that you are definitely going to continue with something, even if it means more effort or money. `We probably should have stopped at that point,' Margaret says, `but we had already invested so much, and as they say, in for a penny, in for a pound.'
See also: pound

in for a penny, in for a pound

used to express someone's intention to see an undertaking through, however much time, effort, or money this entails.
See also: pound

ˌin for a ˈpenny, ˌin for a ˈpound

(saying) once you have decided to start doing something, you may as well do it as well as you can, even if this means spending a lot of time, energy, money, etc: The new carpet made everything else look old, so we thought ‘in for a penny, in for a pound’, and we painted the room and bought a new sofa too!
See also: pound