on impulse

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on impulse

after having had an impulse or sudden thought. On impulse, Bob decided to buy a car. I didn't need a cellular telephone. I just bought it on impulse.
See also: on
References in classic literature ?
Wherever the impulse exceeds, the Rest or Identity insinuates its compensation.
She was, indeed, rather annoyed with herself for having allowed such an ill-considered breach of her reserve, weakening her powers of resistance, she felt, should this impulse return again.
Will saw that she was offended, but this only gave an additional impulse to the new irritation of his latent dislike towards Mr.
But when he tried to express the cooperative impulse that stirred within him, his noises became gibberish.
What Jerry did was to yield in action to a brain impulse to do, not what seemed the easier and more usual thing, but to do what seemed the harder and more unusual thing.
She smiled to herself at vagrant impulses which arose from nowhere and suggested that she rumple his hair; while he desired greatly, when they tired of reading, to rest his head in her lap and dream with closed eyes about the future that was to be theirs.
He obeyed his natural impulses until they ran him counter to some law.
I was myself in shadow, and stood still with clenched hands and set teeth, trying to control the impulse to leap upon and strangle him.
MY first impulse was the reckless impulse to follow Eustace--openly through the streets.
Anne's first impulse was (excusably enough, poor soul) an impulse of resentment.
Perfectly correct," said Morgan; "but before deciding the quantity of powder necessary to give the impulse, I think it would be as well "
The impulse was not confined to literature, but permeated all the life of the time.
It does what it does at each stage because instinct gives it an impulse to do just that, not because it foresees and desires the result of its actions.
But in the depths of his heart, the older he became, and the more intimately he knew his brother, the more and more frequently the thought struck him that this faculty of working for the public good, of which he felt himself utterly devoid, was possibly not so much a quality as a lack of something --not a lack of good, honest, noble desires and tastes, but a lack of vital force, of what is called heart, of that impulse which drives a man to choose someone out of the innumerable paths of life, and to care only for that one.
Having been charged with a certain lack of emotional faculty I am glad to be able to say that on one occasion at least I did give way to a sentimental impulse.