imagine

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(well,) imagine that!

An expression of surprise, astonishment, or disbelief, especially regarding some recent revelation. Bob: "You know, if you run your washing machine at night you can save a lot of money on your electric bill." John: "Well, imagine that! I've never heard of such a thing!" Four hundred people came to see our concert tonight? Imagine that!
See also: imagine

you're imagining things

You're making things up or seeing things that are not real. You're imagining things—there's nothing going on between Bill and me.
See also: imagine, thing

Can you imagine?

Can you believe that?; Imagine that! She wore jeans to the wedding. Can you imagine? Billy was eating the houseplant! Can you imagine?
See also: can

envision someone as someone else

 and envision something as something else
to imagine or fantasize someone as someone else; to imagine or fantasize something as something else. I envision her as the next company president. We envisioned this as larger than it turned out to be.
See also: else

Fancy that!

 and Imagine that!
I am very surprised to hear that.; That is hard to imagine or believe. Mary: My father was elected president of the board. Sally: Fancy that! Sue: This computer is ten times faster than the one we had before. Jane: Imagine that! Is it easy to operate? Sue: Of course not.
See also: fancy

imagine someone or something as someone or something

to think of someone or something as another person or another type of thing. I really can't imagine you as a sailor. When I imagine John as our new president, I really worry about our future as a company.
See also: imagine

Fancy that!

exclam. Imagine that! Fancy that! There’s a piece of pie left in the fridge.
See also: fancy
References in classic literature ?
As you may imagine I was not very anxious to resume the discussion on the justice, expediency, effectiveness or what not, of Fyne's journey to London.
But, Grandfather," interposed Charley, who was a matter-of-fact little person, "what reason have you, to imagine so?
The fish is held by the tail, and the head being introduced into the mouth, the animal disappears with a rapidity that would at first nearly lead one to imagine it had been launched bodily down the throat.
Let no one imagine, however, that the lovely Fayaway was in the habit of swallowing great vulgar-looking fishes: oh, no; with her beautiful small hand she would clasp a delicate, little, golden-hued love of a fish and eat it as elegantly and as innocently as though it were a Naples biscuit.
replied my Husband in a most nobly contemptuous Manner) and dost thou then imagine that there is no other support for an exalted mind (such as is my Laura's) than the mean and indelicate employment of Eating and Drinking?
Altho' Lady Dorothea's visit was nominally to Philippa and Augusta, yet I have some reason to imagine that (acquainted with the Marriage and arrival of Edward) to see me was a principal motive to it.
You will easily imagine therefore my Dear Marianne that I could not feel any ardent affection or very sincere Attachment for Lady Dorothea.
I imagine that a pickpocket, proud of his light fingers, must feel a sort of indignation with the careless woman who leaves in a cab a vanity-bag with all her jewels in it.
I imagine that Freemasonry is the fraternity and equality of men who have virtuous aims," said Pierre, feeling ashamed of the inadequacy of his words for the solemnity of the moment, as he spoke.
You could imagine you were dwelling in marble halls, couldn't you?
It was pretty interesting to imagine things about them--to imagine that perhaps the girl who sat next to you was really the daughter of a belted earl, who had been stolen away from her parents in her infancy by a cruel nurse who died before she could confess.
The reader, from what hath been said, may imagine that the reconciliation (if indeed it could be so called) was only matter of form; we shall therefore pass it over, and hasten to what must surely be thought matter of substance.
Besides, by how much the worse man he represented his brother to be, so much the greater would his own offence appear to Allworthy, and so much the greater, he had reason to imagine, would be his resentment.
If we imagine some piece of music that we know, we can go through it in our mind from beginning to end without any discoverable tendency to suppose that we are really hearing it.
Images of bodily movements, such as we have when we imagine moving an arm or, on a smaller scale, pronouncing a word, might possibly be explained away on Professor Watson's lines, as really consisting in small incipient movements such as, if magnified and prolonged, would be the movements we are said to be imagining.