shake a disease or illness off

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shake a disease or illness off

Fig. [for the body] to fight off a disease or illness. I thought I was catching a cold, but I guess I shook it off. I hope I can shake off this flu pretty soon.
See also: disease, off, shake
References in classic literature ?
It astonished her that Tom's sisters could be satisfied with remaining in London at such a time, through an illness which had now, under different degrees of danger, lasted several weeks.
After that day I was for some weeks--eight or nine as I remember--very much with Caddy, and thus it fell out that I saw less of Ada at this time than any other since we had first come together, except the time of my own illness.
With his untidy beard and long hair, his features, always a little larger than life, now emphasised by illness, he had an extraordinary aspect; but it was so odd that it was not quite ugly.
The diagnosis of dangerous illness would be accepted by one with a laugh and a joke, by another with dumb despair.
By Friday it could not be denied that the illness was no longer an attack that would pass off in a day or two; it was a real illness that required a good deal of organisation, and engrossed the attention of at least five people, but there was no reason to be anxious.
Vincy felt as if, after all, the illness had made a festival for her tenderness.
I've often heard her speak of you--especially since the illness assumed a serious character.
My sister was her husband's only attendant throughout his illness," the Baron informed us.
He complained of illness, and going to his room took to his bed.
 It is said that in his last illness the poet Arnegriff was
Dorrimore I did not see him: the clerk in the Putnam House explained that a slight illness confined him to his rooms.
When the evidence touched on his wife's illness and death, he was deeply affected, and covered his face with his hands.
I was a very constant and attentive visitor to him throughout the whole period of his illness and convalescence; not only from the interest I took in his recovery, and my desire to cheer him up and make the utmost possible amends for my former 'brutality,' but from my growing attachment to himself, and the increasing pleasure I found in his society - partly from his increased cordiality to me, but chiefly on account of his close connection, both in blood and in affection, with my adored Helen.
She had hastened home, hearing of her beloved friend's illness.
As a man who had seen something of life, and neither a fool nor an invalid, he had no faith in medicine, and in his heart was furious at the whole farce, specially as he was perhaps the only one who fully comprehended the cause of Kitty's illness.