ice

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ice

1. n. diamonds; jewels. (Underworld.) That old dame has tons of ice in her hotel room.
2. n. cocaine; crystalline cocaine. (Drugs.) Max deals mostly in ice but can get you almost anything.
3. tv. to kill someone; to kill an informer. (see also chill.) Mr. Big ordered Sam to ice you-know-who.
4. tv. to ignore someone. (see also chill.) Bart iced Sam for obvious reasons.
5. tv. to embarrass someone; to make someone look foolish. Don’t ice me in front of my friends.
6. n. money given as a bribe, especially to the police. (Underworld.) A lot of those cops take ice.
7. mod. excellent; very cool. Her answer was ice, and she really put down that guy.
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References in classic literature ?
One night--he had unbuckled himself after ten hours' waiting above a "blind" seal-hole, and was staggering back to the village faint and dizzy--he halted to lean his back against a boulder which happened to be supported like a rocking-stone on a single jutting point of ice.
Their voices were soon swallowed up by the cold, empty dark, and Kotuko and the girl shouldered close together as they strained on the pulling-rope or humoured the sleigh through the ice in the direction of the Polar Sea.
There were gullies and ravines, and holes like gravel-pits, cut in ice; lumps and scattered pieces frozen down to the original floor of the floe; blotches of old black ice that had been thrust under the floe in some gale and heaved up again; roundish boulders of ice; saw-like edges of ice carved by the snow that flies before the wind; and sunken pits where thirty or forty acres lay below the level of the rest of the field.
Kotuko laid up a snow-house large enough to take in the hand-sleigh (never be separated from your meat), and while he was shaping the last irregular block of ice that makes the key-stone of the roof, he saw a Thing looking at him from a little cliff of ice half a mile away.
In the middle of his song the girl started, laid her mittened hand and then her head to the ice floor of the hut.
Also, the strong current which sets east out of Lancaster Sound carried with it mile upon mile of what they call pack-ice--rough ice that has not frozen into fields; and this pack was bombarding the floe at the same time that the swell and heave of the storm-worked sea was weakening and undermining it.
Now, as the Inuit say, when the ice once wakes after its long winter sleep, there is no knowing what may happen, for solid floe-ice changes shape almost as quickly as a cloud.
When they left the hut after the gale, the noise on the horizon was steadily growing, and the tough ice moaned and buzzed all round them.
This battering-ram ice was, so to speak, the first army that the sea was flinging against the floe.
The talking of the ice grew louder and louder round them, but the mound stayed fast, and, as the girl looked at him, he threw his right elbow upward and outward, making the Inuit sign for land in the shape of an island.
When they waked there was open water on the north beach of the island, and all the loosened ice had been driven landward.
He was the first of some twenty or thirty seal that landed on the island in the course of the day, and till the sea froze hard there were hundreds of keen black heads rejoicing in the shallow free water and floating about with the floating ice.
They left five-and-twenty seal carcasses buried in the ice of the beach, all ready for use, and hurried back to their people.
About ten men mounted the sides of the Nautilus, armed with pickaxes to break the ice around the vessel, which was soon free.
This would give three thousand feet of ice above us; one thousand being above the water-mark.