hurl


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hurl: Hurley

hurl insults (at someone)

 and throw insults (at someone)
Fig. to direct insults at someone; to say something insulting directly to someone. Anne hurled an insult at Bob that made him very angry. If you two would stop throwing insults, we could have a serious discussion.
See also: hurl, insult

hurl someone or something at someone or something

to throw someone or something at someone or something. The huge man actually hurled me at the tree. Larry hurled his shoe at me.
See also: hurl

hurl someone or something down

to throw or push someone or something downward to the ground. Roger hurled the football down and it bounced away wildly. He hurled down the football in anger. The angry player hurled the ball down.
See also: down, hurl

hurl someone or something into something

to throw someone or something into something. She hurled the little boys into the storm cellar and went back to the house for the dog. Sharon hurled her belongings into the suitcase and jammed it closed.
See also: hurl

hurl someone or something out (of some place)

 and hurl someone or something out
to throw someone or something out of some place. The manager hurled them out of the tavern. The manager hurled out the annoying people.
See also: hurl, out

hurl something around

to throw something, such as words, around carelessly. Don't just go hurling foul words around like they didn't mean anything. You are just hurling around words!
See also: around, hurl

hurl something away (from someone or something)

to throw or push something away from someone or something. She hurled the bricks away from the partially buried child. Hurl away the bricks as fast as you can.
See also: away, hurl

hurl

1. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (see also earl.) I think I gotta go hurl.
2. n. vomit. There’s hurl all over the bathroom floor!
References in periodicals archive ?
Organizers of da Vinci Days, which celebrates the future in arts, science and technology, paid $2,000 for the big prop, which can hurl items as far as 100 yards.
his workers devised the catapult (from Greek words meaning "to hurl down").
It was the first long-range weapon that could hurl heavy objects, or the first piece of artillery (from a French word relating to a bow, which was the first long-range weapon).
A Galway source said: "It was a pretty low thing to do to steal a lad's hurl before an All-Ireland final but Ollie will get over it.
ALL CHANGE O'Brien's swapping the football for the hurl