hunt

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have a dog in the hunt

To have some vested interest in or something to gain by a given situation. Some people can watch a football game no matter who is playing, but I'm only interested if I've got a dog in the hunt. Many small business owners—whether they know it or not—have a dog in the hunt with this proposed tax bill.
See also: dog, have, hunt

hunt where the ducks are

To pursue or look for one's objectives, results, or goals in the place where one is most likely to find them. If you're looking to expand your customer base, you need to identify who would benefit from your business the most and then hunt where the ducks are.
See also: duck, hunt

snipe hunt

1. A practical joke in which the victim is sent on a hunt for a fictitious animal called a snipe. When I was in the Cub Scouts, the youngest members were always sent out on a snipe hunt by the counselors on the night of our first big campout.
2. By extension, any hunt, search, or quest for something that is fictitious, non-existent, elusive, or illusory. The president has pledged to make universal healthcare a reality, but I think he's really just on a snipe hunt.
See also: hunt, snipe

happy hunting ground

A utopia. Used by Native Americans to describe the afterlife. The annual car swap meet is a happy hunting ground for automotive enthusiasts.
See also: ground, happy, hunting

you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

When two parties are in conflict, you can't support both of them—you must choose one. Come on, you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds—pick a side! You're either in favor of renovating the library, or you're not.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

witch hunt

An attempt to blame and punish people who hold unpopular views and opinions, often under the guise of some other investigation. The ruling party's witch hunt against its detractors sparked a civil war.
See also: hunt, witch

hunt after someone or something

to seek or pursue someone or something. I'm hunting after a tall man with straight black hair. Elaine is hunting after a place to store her bicycle.
See also: after, hunt

hunt for someone or something

 
1. to chase someone or something for sport. The hunter hunted for grouse on the game preserve. Frank likes to hunt for deer.
2. to look for someone or something. I am hunting for someone to help me with the piano. lam hunting for a new piano.
See also: hunt

hunt high and low (for someone or something)

 and look high and low (for someone or something); search high and low (for someone or something)
Fig. to look carefully in every possible place for someone or something. We looked high and low for the right teacher. The Smiths are searching high and low for the home of their dreams.
See also: and, high, hunt, low

hunt someone or something down

 
1. to chase and catch someone or something. I don't know where Amy is, but I'll hunt her down. I'll find her. I will hunt down the villain.
2. to locate someone or something. I don't have a big enough gasket. I'll have to hunt one down. I have to hunt down a good dentist.
See also: down, hunt

hunt someone or something out

to find someone or something even if concealed. We will hunt them all out and find every last one of those guys. We will hunt out all of them. They hunted out the murderer.
See also: hunt, out

hunt through something

to search through the contents of something; to search among things. Joel hunted through his wallet for a dollar bill. I will have to hunt through my drawers for a pair of socks that match.
See also: hunt, through

look someone or something up

 and hunt someone or something up
1. to seek someone, a group, or something out. I lost track of Sally. I'll try to look her up and get in touch with her. lam going to look up an old friend when lam in Chicago. I am going to hunt that old gang up. Ted came into town and looked up his favorite pizza place.
2. to seek information about someone or something in a book or listing. I don't recognize his name. I'll look him up and see what I can find. I'll look up this person in a reference book. She looked herself up in the telephone book to make sure her name was spelled correctly.
See also: look, up

look up

to show promise of improving. My prospects for a job are looking up. Conditions are looking up.
See also: look, up

look up (from something)

to gaze upwards; to stop reading or working and lift one's gaze upward. She looked up from her reading and spoke to us. Mary looked up as we came into the room.
See also: look, up

run with someone or something

to stay in the company of someone or some group. Fred was out running with Larry when they met Vernon. Let's go out and run with the other guys this morning.
See also: run

run with something

 
1. Lit. to run, showing a particular characteristic. Sally runs with speed and grace. Fred runs with tremendous speed.
2. Fig. to take over something and handle it aggressively and independently. I know that Alice can handle the job. She will take it on and run with it. I hope she runs with this next project.
See also: run

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

Fig. to support both sides of a dispute. In our office politics, Sally always tries to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, telling both the clerical workers and the management that she thinks they should prevail.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

look somebody up

also look up somebody
to visit someone Look me up the next time you're in Los Angeles. I hope you'll look up my niece while you're in Pittsburgh.
See also: look, up

look something up

also look up something
to check a fact or get information about something If you don't know the meaning of the word, look it up in your dictionary. The research involved looking up how my opponent voted.
See also: look, up

hunt/search high and low

to search everywhere for something (usually + for ) I've been hunting high and low for the certificate, but I still haven't found it.
See also: and, high, hunt, low

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

  (old-fashioned)
to support two competing sides in an argument You've got to decide where you stand on this issue. You can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.
See run out the clock, go like clockwork, go deep, cast eye over, be run off feet, drive into the ground, have a good run for money, go to seed
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

a witch-hunt

an attempt to find and punish people who have opinions that are believed to be dangerous Senator McCarthy led a witch-hunt against suspected communists during the 1950's.

happy hunting ground

A place where one can find or do what one wishes without restriction. For example, The North Shore is a happy hunting ground for antique collectors. This term alludes to the Native American idea of an afterlife where hunters find unlimited game. [Early 1800s]
See also: ground, happy, hunting

look up

1. Search for in a book or other source, as in I told her to look up the word in the dictionary. [Late 1600s]
2. Call on or visit, as in I'm going to look up my friend in Chicago. [Mid-1800s]
3. Become better, improve, as in Business is finally looking up. [c. 1800]
4. look up to. Admire, respect, as in The students really looked up to Mr. Jones. [Early 1700s]
See also: look, up

run with

1. Also, run around with. Socialize with; see run around, def. 2.
2. Take as one's own, adopt; also, carry out enthusiastically. For example, He wanted to run with the idea and go public immediately.
3. run with the hare, hunt with the hounds. Support two opposing sides at the same time, as in He wants to increase the magazine's circulation along with its price-that's trying to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds . This expression, alluding to being both hunter and hunted at the same time, dates from the 1400s and was already a proverb in John Heywood's 1546 collection.
See also: run

hunt down

v.
1. To pursue, track, or search for something or someone: The panther hunted down the deer. The police hunted the kidnappers down.
2. To find something or someone after a long or difficult search: I hunted down my watch—it was at the bottom of my sock drawer. After two weeks, the detectives finally hunted the suspect down.
See also: down, hunt

look up

v.
1. To direct one's gaze upward: Look up at that cloud; it looks like a dog!
2. To search for information about someone or something from a reference source, such as a book or a file system: He looked up the word "gullible" in the dictionary. I forgot her phone number, so I looked it up on the Internet.
3. To seek out and visit or contact someone: We looked up an old friend when we visited Boston. I looked my college roommate up, and we got together to talk about the old days.
4. To become better; improve: Things are looking up now that the weather's better.
5. look up to To hold someone in high regard: I look up to my parents.
See also: look, up

run with

v.
1. To accompany and participate in the activities of someone or something: Those teenagers run with a wild crowd.
2. To float or sail in the same direction as something:The sailboat ran with the wind all the way to the beach. On the trip back, we can run with the current, and we won't have to paddle the canoe.
3. To adopt something or take something as one's own and then proceed with it: I took their idea for a novel and ran with it.
See also: run

head hunt

tv. & in. to recruit someone (for a job). He went to the conference to head hunt a new employee.
See also: head, hunt
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1968, about 20 percent of all Michigan males 15 years old and older hunted deer with a gun.
ramidus hunted monkeys or any other creatures, says Tim D.
Given that Gombe chimps literally eat away all traces of their colobus prey, Stanford suspects that archaeological data cited by Blumenschine underestimate the extent to which hominids hunted small game.
When I was a kid, I hunted and fished and played pick-up football,'' Bob Hendrix said.
2) Renee Marshall of Pine Valley poses with her first-ever wild boar, which she recently hunted at an all-females bowhunt in Lebec's Tejon Ranch.
Hunted from shore or boats, especially sculls, over decoys set up in saltwaters.
Our forefathers went out and hunted turkeys in the fall and, if our forefathers did it, why can't we?
Comments: The Great Basin Canada goose is the species primarily found in the Southland, where populations are generally not threatened and all species of game geese are hunted.
Surrounding him are the hunters who have enlisted his help - and have doled out $400 for each pig hunted - in tracking down the evasive hogs.
Last year, many non-residents who hunted in the south were left out in the cold again when the hunting regulations implied tags would be sold first-come, first-served beginning in May.
It could lead to local extinction of lions in heavily hunted areas and would do nothing to address the real issues of public safety.