humor

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Related to humors: humoral theory

locker-room humor

Especially crude, vulgar, or bawdy humor. I'm no prude by any means, but I hate the locker-room humor my boyfriend partakes in when his buddies are around.
See also: humor

out of humour

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. After living in Gibraltar for so long, these awful London winters leave me feeling me out of humour.
See also: humour, of, out

be put out of humour

old fashioned To be put in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to be made to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I must say, I was put quite out of humor to have been reprimanded like that in front of my colleagues. My wife is always being put out of humour by the cold weather in this part of the country.
See also: humour, of, out, put

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

be out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you're always so out of humour in the morning.
See also: humour, of, out

put (someone) out of humour

old fashioned To put someone in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to make someone feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. Having lived in Gibraltar for most of my life, where the weather remains temperate throughout the year, I must say that these awful London winters put me quite out of humour. It always puts me out of humour to think about the state of our country's political system for too long.
See also: humour, of, out, put

out of sorts

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. I think something is bugging John, because he's been rather out of sorts lately. After living in Florida for so long, these awful Minnesota winters leave me feeling out of sorts. I'm not really keen on dancing. I'm always out of step!
See also: of, out, sort

gallows humor

Humor that aims to make grim subjects, like death, funny or comical. (A "gallows" is the wooden frame from which criminals were traditionally hanged.) A: "Why would he say a morbid thing like that?" B: "Oh, that's just how Uncle Ned is—he's prone to gallows humor."
See also: humor

schoolboy humor

Immature jokes. Guys, enough with the schoolboy humor. Let's try to act like adults, please. Ben thinks he can score points with Leslie by donating to the fundraising campaign she's promoting.
See also: humor, schoolboy

*out of sorts

not feeling well; grumpy and irritable. (*Typically: be ~; feel ~; get ~.) I've been out of sorts for a day or two. I think I'm coming down with something. The baby is out of sorts. Maybe she's getting a new tooth.
See also: of, out, sort

sense of humor

the ability to appreciate good humor and jokes; the ability to create jokes and say funny things. Does he have a sense of humor? He looks like he has never laughed in his life.
See also: humor, of, sense

out of sorts

Irritable, grouchy, as in Don't ask him today-he's out of sorts. This expression also implies that one's poor spirits result from feeling slightly ill. [Early 1600s] The synonym out of humor, on the other hand, used more in Britain than America, simply means "ill-tempered" or "irritable." [Mid-1600s]
See also: of, out, sort

out of sorts

BRITISH
If you are out of sorts, you feel slightly unwell, upset, or annoyed. He returned to his motel room feeling ill-tempered and out of sorts.
See also: of, out, sort

out of humor

In a bad mood; irritable.
See also: humor, of, out

out of sorts

1. Slightly ill.
2. Irritable; cross: The teacher is out of sorts this morning.
See also: of, out, sort
References in periodicals archive ?
Political success and political defeat do not depend on high or low moral standards, but on the harmony or disharmony between the humors of the political man and the humors of time and the disposition of heaven.
Any article that showcases the "value" of humor in healing, begs the fundamental question "what is humor in the first place?
Modern theories of humor relate to "incongruities," things happening to others that are not supposed to occur.
Several milestones that contributed to the current interest in the healing potential of humor are noteworthy.
Norman Cousins (1979) writes the best selling book An Anatomy of an Illness chronicling his adoption of humor and laughter in combating his chronic illness.
the movie and subsequent long running television series demonstrates the pain alleviating role of humor in one of mankind's most stressful environments: combat and war's makeshift surgical hospitals.
Patch Adams, the movie staring Robin Williams, depicts one maverick doctor's recognition of the stale nature of medicine and his recommendation to embrace humor.
Humor functions in two distinct areas of health and healing.
Jewish humor is based on a mindset that looks at things from many different angles.
How does this complexity of Jewish identity play out in the humor itself?
A lot of Jewish humor deals with identity: Jews developed an insider/ outsider sensibility in the countries that they came from.
Humor was natural and arose from character, but wit came from mental ingenuity, which could be cultivated and learned.
By the 1870s a sense of humor was widely accepted as a valuable attribute and someone without one was viewed as deficient.
For men, humor is used to boost self-presentation both to other men and women.