humor


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locker-room humor

Especially crude, vulgar, or bawdy humor. I'm no prude by any means, but I hate the locker-room humor my boyfriend partakes in when his buddies are around.
See also: humor

out of humour

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. After living in Gibraltar for so long, these awful London winters leave me feeling me out of humour.
See also: humour, of, out

be put out of humour

old fashioned To be put in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to be made to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I must say, I was put quite out of humor to have been reprimanded like that in front of my colleagues. My wife is always being put out of humour by the cold weather in this part of the country.
See also: humour, of, out, put

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

be out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you're always so out of humour in the morning.
See also: humour, of, out

put (someone) out of humour

old fashioned To put someone in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to make someone feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. Having lived in Gibraltar for most of my life, where the weather remains temperate throughout the year, I must say that these awful London winters put me quite out of humour. It always puts me out of humour to think about the state of our country's political system for too long.
See also: humour, of, out, put

out of sorts

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. I think something is bugging John, because he's been rather out of sorts lately. After living in Florida for so long, these awful Minnesota winters leave me feeling out of sorts.
See also: of, out, sort

gallows humor

Humor that aims to make grim subjects, like death, funny or comical. (A "gallows" is the wooden frame from which criminals were traditionally hanged.) A: "Why would he say a morbid thing like that?" B: "Oh, that's just how Uncle Ned is—he's prone to gallows humor."
See also: humor

schoolboy humor

Immature jokes. Guys, enough with the schoolboy humor. Let's try to act like adults, please.
See also: humor, schoolboy

*out of sorts

not feeling well; grumpy and irritable. (*Typically: be ~; feel ~; get ~.) I've been out of sorts for a day or two. I think I'm coming down with something. The baby is out of sorts. Maybe she's getting a new tooth.
See also: of, out, sort

sense of humor

the ability to appreciate good humor and jokes; the ability to create jokes and say funny things. Does he have a sense of humor? He looks like he has never laughed in his life.
See also: humor, of, sense

out of sorts

Irritable, grouchy, as in Don't ask him today-he's out of sorts. This expression also implies that one's poor spirits result from feeling slightly ill. [Early 1600s] The synonym out of humor, on the other hand, used more in Britain than America, simply means "ill-tempered" or "irritable." [Mid-1600s]
See also: of, out, sort

out of sorts

BRITISH
If you are out of sorts, you feel slightly unwell, upset, or annoyed. He returned to his motel room feeling ill-tempered and out of sorts.
See also: of, out, sort

out of sorts

1 slightly unwell. 2 in low spirits; irritable.
See also: of, out, sort

out of humor

In a bad mood; irritable.
See also: humor, of, out

out of sorts

1. Slightly ill.
2. Irritable; cross: The teacher is out of sorts this morning.
See also: of, out, sort
References in periodicals archive ?
The newly modernized Good Humor Truck is revolutionizing the traditional ice cream truck.
Another aspect worth noticing in English-language analyses is the importance attached to the role of social, economic, and cultural factors in literature with humor in the Ming (1368-1644 AD) and Qing dynasties (1644-1912 AD).
Researchers have examined the impact of humor on a wide range of learning related characteristics.
In particular, Debatable Humor focuses on the numerous candidate debates conducted during the 2008 presidential primaries.
1992) The physiologic effects of humor, mirth and laughter.
While Chey does make an admirable effort to provide a comprehensive view of humor in China, the chapters themselves are a limited and somewhat disjointed sampling of such a broad topic.
A partir de los anos 70, las investigaciones sobre el humor se desarrollan en diferentes disciplinas como la psicologia, medicina, biologia, sociologia y la educacion (Carbelo, 2005).
If you still cannot laugh, you are indeed in humor response trouble Rate yourself on a depression scale and consult a psychiatric professional as needed or look at any picture of yourself from the 1980s.
In management literature, there is growing empirical research exploring the connections between humor and job-related attitudes.
The relationship between student perceptions of instructor humor and students' reports of learning.
A positive effect "There is reason to believe that sense of humor continues to have a positive effect on mental health and social life, even after people have become retirees, although the positive effect on life expectancy could not be shown after the age of 75.
Nursing is a serious business, requiring intense education, but educators may find that humor is the key to helping students retain content in the classroom setting (Garner, 2006).
he never finished his dissertation) in psychology, he teaches a course called The Art and Science of Humor at the University of Michigan.
A SENSE OF HUMOR IS PART OF THE ART OF LEADERSHIP, OF GETTING ALONG WITH PEOPLE, OF GETTING THINGS DONE.
The ability to understand and create humor is a high-order cognitive function that might elude some patients with mental illness.