humble

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eat crow

 
1. . Fig. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I'm going to have to eat crow. I'll be eating crow if I'm not shown to be right.
2. Fig. to be shamed; to admit that one was wrong. When it became clear that they had arrested the wrong person, the police had to eat crow. Mary talked to Joe as if he was an uneducated idiot, till she found out he was a college professor. That made her eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

to act very humble when one is shown to be wrong. I think I'm right, but if I'm wrong, I'll eat humble pie. You think you're so smart. I hope you have to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie

in my humble opinion

Cliché a phrase introducing the speaker's opinion. "In my humble opinion," began Fred, arrogantly, "I have achieved what no one else ever could." Bob: What are we going to do about the poor condition of the house next door? Bill: In my humble opinion, we will mind our own business.
See also: humble, opinion

eat crow

to publicly admit you were wrong about something Charles had to eat crow and tell them they were right all along.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

  (British, American & Australian) also eat crow (American)
to be forced to admit that you are wrong and to say you are sorry The producers of the advert had to eat humble pie and apologize for misrepresenting the facts.
See also: eat, humble, pie

eat crow

Also, eat dirt or humble pie . Be forced to admit a humiliating mistake, as in When the reporter got the facts all wrong, his editor made him eat crow. The first term's origin has been lost, although a story relates that it involved a War of 1812 encounter in which a British officer made an American soldier eat part of a crow he had shot in British territory. Whether or not it is true, the fact remains that crow meat tastes terrible. The two variants originated in Britain. Dirt obviously tastes bad. And humble pie alludes to a pie made from umbles, a deer's undesirable innards (heart, liver, entrails). [Early 1800s] Also see eat one's words.
See also: crow, eat

eat crow

tv. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I’m going to have to eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat crow

To be forced to accept a humiliating defeat.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

To be forced to apologize abjectly or admit one's faults in humiliating circumstances.
See also: eat, humble, pie

humble abode

A self-deprecating way to refer to one's home. Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is the source: the insufferable Mr. Collins refers to his patroness Lady Catherine de Burgh with “The garden in which stands my humble abode is separated only by a lane from Rosings Park, her ladyship's residence'' and “But she is perfectly amiable, and often condescends to drive by my humble abode in her little phaeton and ponies.''
See also: abode, humble

humble pie

A meek admission of a mistake. The “humble pie” that we eat when we make a misjudgment or outright error was originally “umble” pie made from the intestines of other less appetizing animal parts. Servants and other lower-class people ate them, as opposed to better cuts. “Umble” became “humble” over the years until eating that pie came to mean expressing a very meek mea culpa. A similar phrase is “eat crow,” the bird being as unpalatable a dish as one's own words.
See also: humble, pie
References in periodicals archive ?
I was so touched, it stuck to me since then, it was a sense of human decency, such humility and humbleness.
Perhaps we should forget such humbleness and all be ringing bells and bellowing like a convention of town '' criers about the virtues of living and working in this glorious and welcoming place
The image's subject, an isolated tropical tree at the edge of a parking lot, is representative in its humbleness and outdoor, out-of-the-way location.
Eugene Baha'i Center - Humbleness is the theme of a devotional gathering at 10 a.
Watanabe, 52, said because of the humbleness of such ingredients, the key components of the fried noodles remained unchanged for decades and thus ended up becoming something ubiquitous in the area, now being offered at 200 to 300 outlets.
Humbleness and spirituality/religious themes were consistent throughout each interview.
Thirty years ago, from the humbleness of beginnings, I would never have dreamed that we would have been blessed with the success we have enjoyed," Dave McDowell says.
I accept your free and courageous decision which reflects your humbleness and I'm sure that you will maintain ties with the Maronite Church though prayers, wisdom, advice and sacrifices.
Gul said that he was receiving the prize with profound honour and humbleness on behalf of his beloved country and the people of Turkey.
Abu57 If only the world had more people in it like Mary - and I don't just mean Mary's generosity but her humbleness in bequeathing after her death without thought for thanks or publicity.
While broadcast will be their major media tool, what of the brevity and humbleness of the poster and its marketing power, now things have begun hotting up?
This will requite, as Lopresti rightly suggests, a basic humbleness to learn from the other.
Your vocabulary, along with your humbleness, has been found wanting.
To see how [Iraqi civilians] live compared to how we live, you really get a sense of humbleness and a great amount of value out of life.
There is a humbleness of hindsight that, while equating the company's over-confidence to that of the Titanic voyage, allows that the mistakes were flaws of judgment rather than character.