huff

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go off in a huff

To leave in an angry, belligerent, or vexed mood. Don't go off in a huff like that, it was only a joke! Mary went off in a huff after her wife criticized her cooking.
See also: huff, off

huff and puff

Fig. to breathe very hard; to pant as one exerts effort. John came up the stairs huffing and puffing. He huffed and puffed and finally got up the steep hill.
See also: and, huff, puff

*in a huff

Fig. in an angry or offended manner. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~.) He heard what we had to say, then left in a huff. She came in a huff and ordered us to bring her something to eat.
See also: huff

huff and puff

1. to breathe in a noisy manner He was on the top of the hill long before I came up huffing and puffing behind him.
2. to complain The owners will huff and puff about their financial problems and then not do anything to solve them.
See also: and, huff, puff

huff and puff

 
1. to breathe noisily, usually because you have been doing physical exercise They're so unfit they start huffing and puffing if they have to run further than twenty yards.
2. (informal) to complain noisily about something but not be able to do anything about it They huffed and puffed about the price, but eventually they paid up.
See also: and, huff, puff

in a huff

  (informal)
feeling angry with someone because they have done or said something to upset you She's in a huff because I forgot to call her last night. He walked off in a huff because I hadn't saved him a space at the table.
See also: huff

huff and puff

Make noisy, empty threats; bluster. For example, You can huff and puff about storm warnings all you like, but we'll believe it when we see it . This expression uses two words of 16th-century origin, huff, meaning "to emit puffs of breath in anger," and puff, meaning "to blow in short gusts," and figuratively, "to inflate" or "make conceited." They were combined in the familiar nursery tale, "The Three Little Pigs," where the wicked wolf warns, "I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down"; rhyme has helped these idioms survive.
See also: and, huff, puff

in a huff

In an offended manner, angrily, as in When he left out her name, she stalked out in a huff. This idiom transfers huff in the sense of a gust of wind to a burst of anger. [Late 1600s] Also see in a snit.
See also: huff
References in periodicals archive ?
But how do you regulate products used for huffing, bagging and over-the-counter medications when the possibilities for abuse are found in hundreds of them?
She's also learned to talk through her feelings instead of huffing them away.