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In June 1995, Habitat launched the Environmental Initiative Partnership to "discover and share ways of building simple decent houses that are resource-efficient and responsible in their design, construction and maintenance," says a Habitat press release.
Despite the rise in prices, the McCallas didn't feel they got $45,000 more than sellers of unimproved houses nearby.
Their home is part of the Fieldstone Series, a tract of 13 higher-end houses.
The survey will address physical, social, and institutional conditions affecting health at the levels of house, neighborhood, and community, according to task force member David Ormandy, a principal research fellow at the University of Warwick Law School in Coventry, England.
As White notes, parental violence against children was perceived very differently in the early nineteenth century; such control was a normalized element of the relations within houses.
1] Muthesius, cultural attach[acute{e}] at the German Embassy in London, was writing to try to convert his nation to the English predilection for living in houses (as opposed to the Continental one for apartments).
House Democrats, meanwhile, have expressed no interest in letting the issue die.
a newspaper article about past White House renovations
Neighboring houses face straight onto the street, but this gem sits at a forty-five-degree angle to command the views-and your attention.
People moved into this area because they like open space," Brough recalled recently while sitting at a table in the barn he built to house his woodcarving hobby.
While the steel house was important in the development of modern architecture it was primarily the liberating frame, advanced through the influential designs for the Farnsworth House and the later Case Study Houses, that prompted radical re-considerations of domestic space and patterns of living.
In the open houses I've experienced, the naifs who appear on "House Hunters" would be trampled and devoured like the herd weaklings in a pack of wildebeest on the Discovery Channel.
The authors play a larger field without showing any particular preference for large or small, palatial or plain houses.
When the building work began at Winchester Greens, many of the original inhabitants could not believe that they would really be allowed to live in the new houses.