hound

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Related to hounds: Sight hounds

hold with the hare and run with the hounds

1. To support or attempt to placate both sides of a conflict or dispute. Many have criticized the US government of holding with the hare and running with the hound regarding the territorial dispute between the two nations.
2. To act duplicitously or hypocritically; to speak or act out against something while engaging or taking part in it. How can you be taken seriously as an anti-drug reformer when extensive documents reveal that you are a frequent user of methamphetamine? You can't hold with the hare and run with the hound, Senator.
See also: and, hare, hold, hound, run

hound someone

1. To hunt, chase, or pursue someone relentlessly. Police hounded the suspect for days, pursuing him as far as the border to Mexico, where he was finally arrested.
2. To badger, hector, or pester someone, especially persistently or relentlessly. I wish my boss would stop hounding me about that report. The press hounded the president about the country's involvement in the foreign war.
See also: hound

be hounded (by someone or something)

To be pursued, chased, badgered, or pestered (by someone or something), especially persistently or relentlessly. The president was hounded by the media about the country's involvement in the foreign war. I'm sick of being hounded by you to finish this assignment. The suspect was hounded by police for days, being pursued as far as the border before he was finally arrested.
See also: hound

publicity hound

Someone who seeks to have the attention of the public constantly focused on him- or herself, typically by means of attracting media coverage. The former actor's run at politics is seen by many as just another stunt by a publicity hound desperate to keep the spotlight on himself.
See also: hound

rock hound

1. Someone who professionally studies the origin, history, structure, and composition of the Earth; a geologist. We found some kind of mineral deposit during the dig, so the university is going to send some rock hounds over to have a look at it.
2. An amateur collector of rocks, minerals, gemstones, fossils, etc.; one who collects and/or studies such things as a hobby. Great hike, Dan—nothing to see here but a bunch of boring dirt and stones. Only a rock hound like you could find this interesting!
See also: hound, rock

you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

When two parties are in conflict, you can't support both of them—you must choose one. Come on, you can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds—pick a side! You're either in favor of renovating the library, or you're not.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

(as) clean as a hound's tooth

1. Very clean; spotless. This house needs to be clean as a hound's tooth before Pop comes to visit.
2. Reputable and honest; free of wrongdoing. Oh, Donny is very trustworthy—his behavior has always been as clean as a hound's tooth.
See also: clean, tooth

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

1. To support or attempt to placate both sides of a conflict or dispute. Many have criticized the US government of running with the hare and hunting with the hound regarding the territorial dispute between the two nations.
2. To act duplicitously or hypocritically; to speak or act out against something while engaging or taking part in it. How can you be taken seriously as an anti-drug reformer when extensive documents reveal that you are a frequent user of methamphetamine? You can't run with the hare and hunt with the hound, Senator.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

*clean as a hound's tooth

 and *clean as a whistle 
1. Rur. Cliché very clean. (*Also: as ~.) After his mother scrubbed him thoroughly, the baby was as clean as a hound's tooth. The car was as clean as a whistle after the Girl Scouts washed it.
2. Rur. Cliché innocent and free from sin or wrong. (*Also: as ~.) Jane's record was clean as a whistle; she had never committed even the smallest infraction.
See also: clean, tooth

hound someone from some place

 and hound someone out (of something or some place)
to chase someone out of some place; to force someone out of something or some place. They hounded Joel and his friends from the town. The sheriff hounded Tex out of town.
See also: hound, place

hound someone or an animal down

to pursue and capture someone or an animal. I will hound the killer down if it takes me the rest of my life. I will hound down that killer if it takes years.
See also: animal, down, hound

hound someone out

(of something or some place) Go to hound someone from some place.
See also: hound, out

hound something out of someone

Fig. to force someone to give information. We are going to have to hound the information out of her. We hounded the combination to the safe out of them.
See also: hound, of, out

run with someone or something

to stay in the company of someone or some group. Fred was out running with Larry when they met Vernon. Let's go out and run with the other guys this morning.
See also: run

run with something

 
1. Lit. to run, showing a particular characteristic. Sally runs with speed and grace. Fred runs with tremendous speed.
2. Fig. to take over something and handle it aggressively and independently. I know that Alice can handle the job. She will take it on and run with it. I hope she runs with this next project.
See also: run

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

Fig. to support both sides of a dispute. In our office politics, Sally always tries to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds, telling both the clerical workers and the management that she thinks they should prevail.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

run with

1. Also, run around with. Socialize with; see run around, def. 2.
2. Take as one's own, adopt; also, carry out enthusiastically. For example, He wanted to run with the idea and go public immediately.
3. run with the hare, hunt with the hounds. Support two opposing sides at the same time, as in He wants to increase the magazine's circulation along with its price-that's trying to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds . This expression, alluding to being both hunter and hunted at the same time, dates from the 1400s and was already a proverb in John Heywood's 1546 collection.
See also: run

run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

BRITISH, LITERARY
If someone runs with the hare and hunts with the hounds, they try to support both sides in an argument or fight. They want to keep the peace and have everybody happy. For this reason they learn very quickly to run with the hares and hunt with the hounds. Note: A hound is a dog that has been bred for hunting.
See also: and, hare, hound, hunt, run

run with

v.
1. To accompany and participate in the activities of someone or something: Those teenagers run with a wild crowd.
2. To float or sail in the same direction as something:The sailboat ran with the wind all the way to the beach. On the trip back, we can run with the current, and we won't have to paddle the canoe.
3. To adopt something or take something as one's own and then proceed with it: I took their idea for a novel and ran with it.
See also: run

chow hound

n. someone who loves to eat; a heavy eater. Okay, listen up all you chow hounds. There’s extra beans tonight!
See also: chow, hound

cunt hound

n. a lecher. (Rude and derogatory.) Tod is such a cunt hound. All he thinks about is dames.
See also: cunt, hound

hooch hound

and hooch head
n. a drunkard. Jed is a classic hooch hound. He lives for the stuff. Hooch heads unite! You have nothing to lose but your brains!
See also: hooch, hound

pot hound

and pot sniffer
n. a dog trained to sniff out cannabis. (Drugs.) The pot hound at the airport is always busy finding marijuana. A cute beagle named sparky greeted me as today’s “pot sniffer” in the baggage claim area.
See also: hound, pot

clean as a hound's tooth

Completely blemish-free or honest. Another Southern expression; hounds' teeth are apparently cleaner than those of other species. Or perhaps just their canine teeth.
See also: clean, tooth
References in classic literature ?
Laugh if you will, boy,” said Leather-Stocking, “ the hounds be out, and are hunting a deer, No man can deceive me in such a matter.
These variations in the tones of the hounds passed with amazing rapidity; and, while his eyes were glancing along the margin of the water, a tearing of the branches of the alder and dogwood caught his attention, at a spot near them and at the next moment a noble buck sprang on the shore, and buried himself in the lake.
Who remembers the kill in the market-place, when the Governor bade the assembled sheikhs and warriors observe how the hounds would instantly devour the body of Abu Hussein; but how, when he had scientifically broken it up, the weary pack turned from it in loathing, and Farag wept because he said the world's face had been blackened?
The Inspector presented his letters in a society where they make much of horses, more of hounds, and are tolerably civil to men who can ride.
like a hound, yet larger than any hound that ever mortal
The idea of some ghastly presence constantly haunted him, and on more than one occasion he has asked me whether I had on my medical journeys at night ever seen any strange creature or heard the baying of a hound.
If the guards who follow their hounds happen to discover there is an issue to the grotto, there is no help for us, for on entering they must see both ourselves and our boat.
Black hound of Gascony," he muttered, "evil the day that you and those like you set foot in free England
A wreath of blue smoke floated up through a hole in the thatch, and was the only sign of life in the place, save a great black hound which lay sleeping chained to the door-post.
This last straight two miles and a half is always a vantage ground for the hounds, and the hares know it well; they are generally viewed on the side of Barby Hill, and all eyes are on the lookout for them to-day.
And at this stage of the run, when the evening is closing in already, no one remarks whether you run a little cunning or not; so you should stick to those crafty hounds who keep edging away to the right, and not follow a prodigal like young Brooke, whose legs are twice as long as yours and of cast- iron, wholly indifferent to one or two miles more or less.
The hounds are drawn up to the hall-door, and little Rawdon descends amongst them, excited yet half-alarmed by the caresses which they bestow upon him, at the thumps he receives from their waving tails, and at their canine bickerings, scarcely restrained by Tom Moody's tongue and lash.
Hounds and horsemen disappear, and little Rawdon remains on the doorsteps, wondering and happy.
His growl and his bark are all that is left him now; you may come on, friend; the hound is toothless.
The train taken by his thoughts had, already, conducted him, in imagination, far into an ideal world, when he was, once more suddenly, recalled to the reality of his situation, by the movements of the faithful hound.