hormone therapy

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hormone therapy

A medical intervention in which hormones are used as a course of treatment for a particular illness. My grandmother is now undergoing hormone therapy for her cancer—I sure hope it works.
References in periodicals archive ?
For years, people have argued that synthetic hormones and bioidentical hormones are the same.
The first step is to have your blood tested using Life Extension's Female Hormone Blood Panel.
If the hormone is released into the blood by a neurosecretory cell, the mode of action is called neuroendocrine.
Third, many herbs contain constituents that may have some hormone balancing properties by weakly binding to receptor sites without actually altering blood hormone levels.
Constant stress floods the body with stress hormones, which can increase the risk of serious health problems.
He also recommends that women with a family history of autoimmune diseases have their thyroid hormone levels checked annually.
In the clinical trials, volunteers who took growth hormone experienced significantly more swelling in joints and extremities, more carpal tunnel syndrome, and more joint pain than did participants who received a placebo.
Some practitioners also tell women that bio-identical hormones can be customized to fit their individual needs and encourage the use of expensive tests to determine hormone levels.
Environmental toxins tend to affect women more readily than men because they're estrogen imposters: in some cases increasing and stimulating hormone production, in others shutting off receptor sites, and everything in between.
Although the new hormone, should it prove effective as an appetite suppressant in humans, would be quite useful in our age of obesity, it would never be available in pill form.
OGX-011 is a targeted therapeutic that sensitizes resistant tumors to conventional cancer therapeutics, such as chemotherapy, hormone ablation therapy and radiation therapy.
The next morning, free and bound hormones were separated by addition of 100 [micro]L Sac-Cel (Immunodiagnostic Systems Limited, Tyne and Wear, UK) and a solution of cellulose-coupled antibodies (anti-sheep/goat); tubes were centrifuged, and the pellet of bound radiolabeled hormone was counted (Cobra gamma counter; Packard, Boston, MA, USA).
This hormone is produced naturally by the bodies of males and, in much smaller amounts, by females.
Women who find changing hormone levels bothersome, such as those with migraines or mood problems, may find that the patch may be a better option for them.