holiday

(redirected from holidays)
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Related to holidays: National holidays

all holiday

Ruined, bankrupt, or without work, as of a person, business, or organization. I hear that he showed up drunk to the board meeting on Friday. I'd say it's all holiday for him now.
See also: all, holiday

blind man's holiday

A phrase that refers to the inability to work at night (before electric light was common). It is a "holiday" because one cannot work when it is too dark to see. I don't mind that it gets dark so early in the winter because then we can go home earlier—it's a blind man's holiday! A: "What are you doing home so early?" B: "It's too dark to keep working so we got to take a blind man's holiday."
See also: blind, holiday

busman's holiday

A vacation that is spent engaging in an activity that is similar to what one does for work. As a museum curator, Leonard had a busman's holiday when he went to Paris to visit the Louvre.
See also: holiday

busman's holiday leisure

time spent doing something similar to what one does at work. (Alludes to a bus driver going on a bus tour for his vacation or on a day off.) Tutoring students in the evening is a busman's holiday for our English teacher. It's a bit of a busman's holiday to ask her to be wardrobe mistress for our amateur production in the summer. She's a professional dressmaker.
See also: holiday, leisure

hell on a holiday

Rur. a big commotion. (Use caution with hell.) It was hell on a holiday outside the stadium when the team won the big game. What's going on down on Main Street? Sounds like hell on a holiday!
See also: hell, holiday, on

a busman's holiday

time away from work that is spent doing something that is similar to your usual job Going to the beach is too much of a busman's holiday for him - he's a lifeguard!
See also: holiday

busman's holiday

Free time spent in much the same pursuit as one's work. For example, Weather permitting, the lifeguard spent all her days off at the beach-a real busman's holiday . The term alludes to a bus driver spending his day off taking a long bus ride. [Late 1800s]
See also: holiday
References in classic literature ?
I'll see Bank Holiday through, and then I'm O-R-P-H.
He had a sense of hot sunshine upon sand, of the children of it least transiently opulent holiday makers in a circle round about him, of the whisper, "They are really gentlemen," and then dollop, dollop came the coppers in the hat.
You must understand that I cultivated the Fynes only in the country, in their holiday time.
I expressed no regret at missing Captain Anthony and we proceeded in silence till, on approaching the holiday cottage, Fyne suddenly and unexpectedly broke it by the hurried declaration that he would go on with me a little farther.
Well, well, I've done what I can to make you; and if you will go gadding over half Europe now, every holidays, I can't help it.
And now his school years seemed like a holiday that had come to an end.
It may not be too much to affirm, on the whole, (the people being then in the first stages of joyless deportment, and the offspring of sires who had known how to be merry, in their day), that they would compare favourably, in point of holiday keeping, with their descendants, even at so long an interval as ourselves.
Let any man bet me ten pound as I shall see Cliff's Holiday, and I'll go and stand by myself.
And if Dowlas was to go and stand, and say he'd never seen a wink o' Cliff's Holiday all the night through, I'd back him; and if anybody said as Cliff's Holiday was certain sure, for all that, I'd back him too.
There was no one else in the yard except a stranger, the cook's husband, who had come for the holiday.
There now, you'll have a chance of a holiday with your good man,' said Nikita, who from kindhearted politeness always said something to anyone he was alone with.
you have not given up your pleasant holiday in Italy on my account?
He had a sort of half purpose, which he took just so seriously that its success would crown the holiday, but just so lightly that its failure would not spoil it.
Finding the detective of a sporting turn and eager to employ his holiday, he guided Flambeau and Flambeau's boat down to the best fishing spot in the stream, and was back in his own canoe in twenty minutes to join Father Brown in the library and plunge equally politely into the priest's more philosophic pleasures.
Walking into the City in the holiday afternoon, he walked against a living stream setting out of it; and thus, when he turned into the precincts of St Mary Axe, he found a prevalent repose and quiet there.