hold someone's hand

hold (one's) hand

1. Literally, to grasp one's hand and continue holding it, as a show of affection, often while walking together or sitting next to each other. I think it's so sweet how Jenny holds Tim's hand when they walk into school.
2. To comfort or support one when they are frightened, anxious, or distressed. I know you're worried about giving your speech, but I'll be there to hold your hand.
3. To carefully guide one through something; to make something very easy for one. Thank you, but I can figure these problems out myself without you holding my hand. The video game is brutally difficult, and it doesn't hold the player's hand at any point.
See also: hand, hold

hold someone's hand

If you hold someone's hand in an unfamiliar or difficult situation, you help and support them. Tony will hold your hand through the sale, deal with offers and advise on particulars. I'll support him up to a point but I can't hold his hand forever. Note: People sometimes use the expression hand-holding to refer to the act of helping and supporting someone. If you expect lots of hand-holding because you're just starting out as an investor, you're probably better off paying a flat fee.
See also: hand, hold

hold someone's hand

give a person comfort, guidance, or moral support in a sad or difficult situation.
See also: hand, hold
References in periodicals archive ?
We'll hold someone's hand from start to finish, but we wanted to make sure that anyone could come in and understand how to use our systems.
Here you come down with this set of skills and this fantasy of what you're going to do, and in the end, the greatest thing that you do is literally hold someone's hand, give them some pain medication," Dr.
When you sit and hold someone's hand as they tell you their story about how they survived and 40 members of their family were wiped out, it's so shocking and yet they talk about moving forward and forgiveness.
Often our touch is obvious--when you hold someone's hand and words are not needed, the person knows you are there and you care about them.
It's a unique opportunity to hold someone's hand when they're scared and want to share details of their life, to listen and calmly reassure them.
The main message to give children up to six or seven is to always hold someone's hand when crossing the road and never go out on their own," says Peter.
Perhaps if you feel uncomfortable giving or asking for a hug, you could hold someone's hand or touch them lightly on their arm.