hold (one's) nerve

(redirected from hold our nerve)
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

hold (one's) nerve

To remain calm, steady, and resolute, especially in the face of danger or adversity. I know learning to drive can be daunting, but if you can hold your nerve out on the road, you'll do just fine.
See also: hold, nerve
References in periodicals archive ?
Ian Powell, PwC UK chairman and senior partner, said: "We took a decision at the start of the downturn to continue to hold our nerve and invest in our business.
This is not the moment to back away or dilute these changes, but rather the moment to hold our nerve, back the change-makers in the NHS who are making it happen, and see the process of change through.
Spokeswoman Karen Jennings said: "Blair may say we need to hold our nerve over NHS reforms - I say that he has a nerve to sit back and oversee hospitals closing, swingeing job cuts and privatisation.
I have told the players we have to keep working, hold our nerve and grind out results even when we are not playing so well.
The statement, 'We should hold our nerve over Iraq' is tantamount to saying let the carnage continue.
Here we have schemes ready to go in a climate that has already seen a number of victims and as a city we need to hold our nerve and carry on with the schemes that are committed and solidly funded while other projects elsewhere may be delayed or shelved.
Our Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett; who represents the militant wing of the Caravan Club, has said in a masterful statement of foreign policy: 'We should hold our nerve over Iraq'.
David mirfin believes Town can win promotion and promised: "We'll hold our nerve.
Hold our nerve and we will have changed Britain for good.
We don't want to blow it now and if we can hold our nerve I'm sure we'll get what we deserve.
It was a game we had to grind out with a bit of character and hold our nerve.
SIR - Our Foreign Secretary, Margaret Beckett, who represents the militant wing of the Caravan Club, has said in a masterful statement of foreign policy, 'We should hold our nerve over Iraq.
And he will insist that the "general thrust and direction of the present reforms are right" adding: "This is not the moment to back away or dilute these changes, but rather the moment to hold our nerve, to back the change-makers in the NHS who are making it happen, and to see the process of change through.