highbrow


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highbrow

1. adjective Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrow, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrow books.
2. noun A person who has or affects heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture, often in a pretentious or elitist manner. Of course, a book like this won't be given the time of day by literary highbrows, but it nevertheless provides an engaging and—dare I say it—entertaining read.

highbrowed

Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrowed, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrowed books.
See also: highbrow

highbrow

1. n. an intellectual person; a person with refined tastes. (see also longhair.) The highbrows usually congregate in there.
2. mod. having to do with an intellectual or a person with refined tastes. Pete is sort of highbrow, but he’s an okay guy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking highbrow to the edge of slapstick," said "Hollywood Reporter" critic Deborah Young, "Sokurov's idiosyncratic adaptation of C* 'Faust' will intrigue some and turn off others.
The negative emphasis on the word highbrow implies it is only for the privileged few, that there is something that the general public cannot appreciate.
Cuddy-Keane discusses, for example, the topicality of the terms highbrow and lowbrow, in the context of heated debates about popular culture versus the role of the intellectual in the modernist period.
Ironically, though, one of the first negative critiques of Ulysses was not that it was too highbrow but that it was not highbrow enough.
For many years, staples of the highbrow American media diet have included NPR News and the New York Times.
Regardless of the practice's technical and theoretical competence, they have never adopted a highbrow architectural position.
It was the seminars that generated the highbrow discussions.
Posh and Becks have made it to highbrow arts channel BBC4, it was announced today.
Well, neither are we - so if it's highbrow, arty farty stuff you're after, you've come to the wrong place.
Bausch's collage style of dance (where everything, choreography and drama, is strictly linear with an underlying theme), has never much varied from its Dadaist, highbrow, vaudeville principles of cheap shock and easy mockery.
Once the return of true, highbrow spirits was legal, the martini became the darling of social events.
Another study, "The Potential Effect of Global Warming and Sea Level Rise in Victoria Island and Lekki," conducted by the Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research (NIOMR), reveals that, besides the possible loss of property, the land mass of Victoria Island and nearby Lekki (an equally highbrow seaside residential area) could shrink by as much as 230 square miles due to coastal erosion and rising sea level.
Plumpp readily admits academia's focus would prefer interest in more highbrow and middlebrow authors.
Some radio executives have suggested that he try to be more highbrow.
Perhaps if the Ramada Hotel chain or Donald Trump had been behind the attempt to annex Manassas the outcome would have been the same, but the fact that it was Disney lent a particular color to the rhetoric of highbrow dissent.