highbrow

(redirected from high-brow)

highbrow

1. adjective Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrow, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrow books.
2. noun A person who has or affects heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture, often in a pretentious or elitist manner. Of course, a book like this won't be given the time of day by literary highbrows, but it nevertheless provides an engaging and—dare I say it—entertaining read.

highbrowed

Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrowed, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrowed books.
See also: highbrow

highbrow

1. n. an intellectual person; a person with refined tastes. (see also longhair.) The highbrows usually congregate in there.
2. mod. having to do with an intellectual or a person with refined tastes. Pete is sort of highbrow, but he’s an okay guy.
References in classic literature ?
I'm willing to be your financial manager, Tom Swift, but please don't ask me to be a high-brow.
He should be treated for what he is - a self-styled high-brow version of rent-a-gob Katie Hopkins.
The race's fun and friendly atmosphere was personified perfectly by friends Alison Roberts, Debbie Jones and Kathryn Ingman who made good use of their ballerina skirts to put a high-brow twist on things.
And while his delivery makes him more of a horseracing than social commentator, the intelligent material - which ran the gamut from high-brow "must-see" TV to Vikings, anthropomorphism to the world's depleting helium stocks - made for a refreshingly entertaining evening.
From the high-brow to the low, The Complete History of Comedy (abridged) covers comedy through the ages, from Aristophanes and Shakespeare to Vaudeville and Charlie Chaplin.
Discerning TV viewers who prefer to immerse themselves in high-brow culture will be thrilled to learn that The Only Way Is Essex returns for a 14th series soon.
It appears that youth is now taking over high-brow culture as well.
They are very high-brow and turn their backs on anyone who they perceive not to hold the same social standing as them.
One high-brow reviewer even wrote: "It's as close to literature as Whiskas cat food is to gastronomy.
This 'intellectual biography' discusses Priestley's role in creating a 'radical Englishness' based on popular culture rather than high-brow intellectualism or 'culture'.
Political guests on the high-brow show also didn't escape Lenny's cutting remarks.
Such is the high-brow literary debate in my office that we came up with our own tribute, sharing our "Dickensian names".
I can't explain why Newsnight should suddenly become so unpopular, but I've a horrible feeling that the programme's relatively high-brow nature will get the blame.
Best of the Culture Show 2010 (BBC Two, Thursday, 7pm) IF like me you've forgone all culture for the past 12 months for the sake of X Factor, Big Brother and I'm A Celeb, then this comprehensive one-hour round-up of all things high-brow should still enable you to pass yourself off as sophisticated at parties.
Dubai There may be an assumption that people who have successfully completed academic studies and gained a PhD have developed a highly sophisticated character and a high-brow attitude to mundane pleasures.