here today, gone tomorrow


Also found in: Wikipedia.

here today, (and) gone tomorrow

Said of something that is short-lived. I can't believe I've already spent the money I got for my birthday. Here today, gone tomorrow!
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

Here today, (and) gone tomorrow.

Prov. Available now, but soon to be gone. (Used to describe something that does not last-often an opportunity). The stores near my house don't stay in business very long—here today, and gone tomorrow. If you want this carpet, buy it now. This sale price is here today, gone tomorrow.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

Lacking permanence, fleeting. For example, His book attracted a great deal of attention but quickly went out of print-here today and gone tomorrow . Originally alluding to the briefness of the human lifespan, this phrase was first recorded in John Calvin's Life and Conversion of a Christian Man (1549): "This proverb that man is here today and gone tomorrow."
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

or

here today and gone tomorrow

If something or someone is here today, gone tomorrow or here today and gone tomorrow, they are only present or only exist for a short time. There have been numerous schemes designed to provide children who are here today, gone tomorrow with the same educational opportunities as settled children. The freedom that they have is not true freedom, and that's because it's here today and gone tomorrow. Note: Journalists sometimes use here today, gone tomorrow before a noun. The presenter described him as a `here today, gone tomorrow minister'. Note: This expression is used to show disapproval.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

here today, gone tomorrow

soon over or forgotten; short-lived or transient.
1996 Sunday Telegraph Apparently when people spend their money on things that are here today gone tomorrow, like flowers, food and Champagne, it tells you more about the state of the economy than when they buy solid things.
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

here toˌday, gone toˈmorrow

if something is here today, gone tomorrow, it only exists or stays for a short time: The restaurant staff don’t tend to stay for very long — they’re here today, gone tomorrow. OPPOSITE: be here to stay
See also: gone, here, tomorrow