hellbender

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hellbender

(ˈhɛlbɛndɚ)
1. n. a drinking bout. (Use caution with hell. Hellbender is also the name of a large salamander.) Jed is off on another of his hellbenders.
2. n. a heavy drinker; a drunkard. (The bender refers to bending the elbow with a drink in hand. Use caution with hell.) Willy is a hellbender from way back.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the impacts are: Most hellbenders captured recently have been found with abnormalities such as missing limbs.
This fall, they made a breakthrough: Captive hellbenders produced eggs and viable sperm for the first time.
Unfortunately, time is not something Ozark hellbenders have a lot of.
Researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla are evaluating overall health conditions, reproductive hormones, and contaminants present in adult and juvenile hellbenders through hematology and serum chemistry work.
The Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi), which can reach a length of about 2 feet (0.
The results showed that the chytrid fungus was present in all remaining populations of the Ozark hellbender in Missouri.
The OHWG has launched a number of research projects that range from evaluating the health of free-ranging hellbenders to measuring the effects of native and non-native fish on larval hellbenders.
Hellbenders raised at zoos and/or fish hatcheries could be used for research or to replenish wild stocks.
Hoessle Herpetarium to work towards propagating hellbenders in captivity (a feat that has not yet been achieved in any zoological institution) and to serve as a holding area for rearing juvenile hellbenders.
Hellbenders are solitary animals, spending their time waiting under den rocks for prey to approach.
Hellbenders live in streams and rivers with good water quality of moderate gradient, and a good flow rate providing oxygenated water.
They point to dams, which slow down the swift currents this amphibian prefers, and development, which produces sediment runoff that fills the rocky nooks hellbenders use for shelter, the AP reported.
Scientists think the demise of the hellbender, which makes its home in streams and rivers, could be a result of declining water quality.
The huts will also be used with captive-reared Hellbenders to investigate if there are benefits to a soft-release.
Siltation from development projects often results in the loss of refugia for Hellbenders, as the large rocks and their openings become smothered.