heave

(redirected from heaving)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

heave into view

To move or rise into sight, especially from a distance. We'd been walking for hours in the barren desert when a small town finally heaved into view.
See also: heave, view

heave a sigh of relief

To experience an intense feeling of happiness or relief because something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class heaved a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors in Europe are heaving a big sigh of relief now that a Greek exit from the Euro has been avoided.
See also: heave, of, relief, sigh

give (one) the heave-ho

To dismiss or reject someone. "Heave-ho" refers to the literal lifting and tossing of an object; in this sense, it is used metaphorically. I can't believe the boss gave me the heave-ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the heave-ho!"
See also: give

give (one) the old heave-ho

To dismiss or reject someone. "Heave-ho" refers to the literal lifting and tossing of an object; in this sense, it is used metaphorically. I can't believe the boss gave me the old heave-ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the old heave-ho!"
See also: give, old

heave ho

1. A sailor's cry to pull hard on a rope. We need to raise anchor, heave ho!
2. An abrupt dismissal or termination, often used in the phrase, "give (one) the (old) heave ho." I can't believe the boss gave me the old heave ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the heave ho."
3. The disposal of something unimportant or unwanted. Give that printer the old heave ho, it doesn't work anymore. Ugh, this cereal is stale now—I'm giving it the heave ho!
See also: heave, ho

heave in(to) sight

Fig. to move into sight in the distance. As the fog cleared, a huge ship heaved into sight. After many days of sailing, land finally heaved in sight.
See also: heave, sight

heave something at someone or something

to throw something at someone or something. Fred heaved a huge snowball at Roger. The thug heaved the rock at the window and broke it to pieces.
See also: heave

heave something up

 
1. Lit. to lift something up. With a lot of effort, they heaved the heavy lid up. The workers heaved up the huge boulder.
2. Fig. to vomit something up. The dog heaved most of the cake up on the kitchen floor. It heaved up the cake it had eaten.
See also: heave, up

heave to

to stop a sailing ship by facing it directly into the wind. The captain gave the order to heave to. The ship hove to and everyone had a swim.
See also: heave

*old heave-ho

the act of throwing someone out; the act of firing someone. (From nautical use, where sailors used heave-ho to coordinate hard physical labor. One sailor called "Heave-ho," and all the sailors would pull at the same time on the ho. *Typically: get ~; give someone ~.) I wanted to complain to the management, but they called a security guard and I got the old heave-ho. That's right. They threw me out! They fired a number of people today, but I didn't get the heave-ho.
See also: old

get the ax

to be forced to give up your job Which employees are most likely to get the ax when the company downsizes?
Related vocabulary: get the boot
See also: ax, get

give somebody the (old) heave ho

  (informal)
to make someone leave a job, or to end your relationship with someone (usually passive) When sales fell, most of the staff were given the old heave ho.
See also: give, heave, ho

get the ax

Also, get the boot or bounce or can or heave-ho or hook or sack . Be discharged or fired, expelled, or rejected. For example, He got the ax at the end of the first week, or The manager was stunned when he got the boot himself, or We got the bounce in the first quarter, or The pitcher got the hook after one inning, or Bill finally gave his brother-in-law the sack. All but the last of these slangy expressions date from the 1870s and 1880s. They all have variations using give that mean "to fire or expel someone," as in Are they giving Ruth the ax?Get the ax alludes to the executioner's ax, and get the boot to literally booting or kicking someone out. Get the bounce alludes to being bounced out; get the can comes from the verb can, "to dismiss," perhaps alluding to being sealed in a container; get the heave-ho alludes to heave in the sense of lifting someone bodily, and get the hook is an allusion to a fishing hook. Get the sack, first recorded in 1825, probably came from French though it existed in Middle Dutch. The reference here is to a workman's sac ("bag") in which he carried his tools and which was given back to him when he was fired. Also see give someone the air.
See also: ax, get

give someone the air

Also, give someone the brush off or the gate or the old heave-ho . Break off relations with someone, oust someone, snub or jilt someone, especially a lover. For example, John was really upset when Mary gave him the air, or His old friends gave him the brush off, or Mary cried and cried when he gave her the gate, or The company gave him the old heave-ho after only a month. In the first expression, which dates from about 1920, giving air presumably alludes to being blown out. The second, from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to brushing away dust or lint. The third, from about 1900, uses gate in the sense of "an exit." The fourth alludes to the act of heaving a person out, and is sometimes used to mean "to fire someone from a job" (see get the ax). All these are colloquialisms, and all have variations using get, get the air (etc.), meaning "to be snubbed or told to leave," as in After he got the brush off, he didn't know what to do.
See also: air, give

heave-ho, give the

See also: give

heave into sight

Rise or seem to rise into view. For example, We waited and waited, and finally the rest of our party heaved into sight. This expression was at first used for ships rising over the horizon. [Late 1700s]
See also: heave, sight

heave to

v.
To steer a sailing ship directly into the wind so that it stops sailing, especially in order to face a storm or to make repairs: We hove to so that we could change the torn sail.
See also: heave

heave up

v.
1. To raise or lift something up, especially with great effort or force: The campers heaved up the flag. The tow truck heaved our car up.
2. To vomit: I heaved up my dinner. The turbulent waves caused the people on the ship to heave their lunch up.
See also: heave, up

get the ax

verb
See also: ax, get

heave

(hiv)
in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. He heaved and heaved and sounded like he was dying.

old heave-ho

(ˈold ˈhivˈho)
n. a dismissal; a physical removal of someone from a place. I thought my job was secure, but today I got the old heave-ho.
See also: old

heave into

sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.
See also: heave
References in classic literature ?
He raised his face toward the heavens and opened his mouth to voice a strange, weird cry that seemed screaming within him for outward expression, but no sound passed his lips--he just stood there for a full minute, his face turned toward the sky, his breast heaving to the pent emotion, like an animate statue of vengeance.
At times he thought he could see heaving masses of men.
During all this time the ship lay rolling in the trough of the sea, the heavy surges breaking over her, and the spars heaving and banging to and fro, bruising the half-drowned sailors that clung to the bowsprit and the stumps of the masts.
Dan's line was out long before Harvey had mastered the mystery of baiting and heaving out the leads.
I saw more truth in it as I lay lonely on this heaving waste.
And then, in the loneliness of the dark, on the heaving breast of the sea that he recognized as one more of the eternal enemies, he began to whimper and cry plaintively like a lost child.
I put Saxtorph and his graveyard gang to work heaving them overside, and over they went, the living and the dead.