heave

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heave into view

To move or rise into sight, especially from a distance. We'd been walking for hours in the barren desert when a small town finally heaved into view.
See also: heave, view

heave a sigh of relief

To experience an intense feeling of happiness or relief because something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class heaved a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors in Europe are heaving a big sigh of relief now that a Greek exit from the Euro has been avoided.
See also: heave, of, relief, sigh

give (one) the heave-ho

To dismiss or reject one. "Heave-ho" refers to the literal lifting and tossing of an object; in this sense, it is used metaphorically. I can't believe the boss gave me the heave-ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the heave-ho!"
See also: give

give (one) the old heave-ho

To dismiss or reject one. "Heave-ho" refers to the literal lifting and tossing of an object; in this sense, it is used metaphorically. I can't believe the boss gave me the old heave-ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the old heave-ho!"
See also: give, old

heave ho

1. A sailor's cry to pull hard on a rope. We need to raise anchor, heave ho!
2. An abrupt dismissal or termination, often used in the phrase, "give (one) the (old) heave ho." I can't believe the boss gave me the old heave ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I never expected her to give him the heave ho."
3. The disposal of something unimportant or unwanted. Give that printer the old heave ho, it doesn't work anymore. Ugh, this cereal is stale now—I'm giving it the heave ho!
See also: heave, ho

heave into sight

To move or rise into view, especially from a distance. We'd been walking for hours in the barren desert when finally a small town heaved into sight.
See also: heave, sight

heave to

To turn a ship into the wind so as to stop forward motion. In this usage, the past tense of "heave" is "hove." We need to heave to with those nasty storm clouds on the horizon!
See also: heave

heave up

1. To pick something up, usually when doing so is difficult or taxing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "heave" and "up." Can you guys heave up this big box for me?
2. To vomit. A noun or pronoun can be used between "heave" and "up." I've been so sick that I feel like I've heaved up everything I've ever eaten.
See also: heave, up

the (old) heave-ho

A dismissal or rejection of a person, especially from a place of employment. I can't believe the boss gave me the old heave-ho after five years on the job! A: "Did you hear that Liz broke up with Dan?" B: "Wow, I knew there's be fallout over his infidelity, but I never expected her to give him the heave-ho!"

heave in(to) sight

Fig. to move into sight in the distance. As the fog cleared, a huge ship heaved into sight. After many days of sailing, land finally heaved in sight.
See also: heave, sight

heave something at someone or something

to throw something at someone or something. Fred heaved a huge snowball at Roger. The thug heaved the rock at the window and broke it to pieces.
See also: heave

heave something up

 
1. Lit. to lift something up. With a lot of effort, they heaved the heavy lid up. The workers heaved up the huge boulder.
2. Fig. to vomit something up. The dog heaved most of the cake up on the kitchen floor. It heaved up the cake it had eaten.
See also: heave, up

heave to

to stop a sailing ship by facing it directly into the wind. The captain gave the order to heave to. The ship hove to and everyone had a swim.
See also: heave

*old heave-ho

the act of throwing someone out; the act of firing someone. (From nautical use, where sailors used heave-ho to coordinate hard physical labor. One sailor called "Heave-ho," and all the sailors would pull at the same time on the ho. *Typically: get ~; give someone ~.) I wanted to complain to the management, but they called a security guard and I got the old heave-ho. That's right. They threw me out! They fired a number of people today, but I didn't get the heave-ho.
See also: old

get the ax

Also, get the boot or bounce or can or heave-ho or hook or sack . Be discharged or fired, expelled, or rejected. For example, He got the ax at the end of the first week, or The manager was stunned when he got the boot himself, or We got the bounce in the first quarter, or The pitcher got the hook after one inning, or Bill finally gave his brother-in-law the sack. All but the last of these slangy expressions date from the 1870s and 1880s. They all have variations using give that mean "to fire or expel someone," as in Are they giving Ruth the ax?Get the ax alludes to the executioner's ax, and get the boot to literally booting or kicking someone out. Get the bounce alludes to being bounced out; get the can comes from the verb can, "to dismiss," perhaps alluding to being sealed in a container; get the heave-ho alludes to heave in the sense of lifting someone bodily, and get the hook is an allusion to a fishing hook. Get the sack, first recorded in 1825, probably came from French though it existed in Middle Dutch. The reference here is to a workman's sac ("bag") in which he carried his tools and which was given back to him when he was fired. Also see give someone the air.
See also: ax, get

give someone the air

Also, give someone the brush off or the gate or the old heave-ho . Break off relations with someone, oust someone, snub or jilt someone, especially a lover. For example, John was really upset when Mary gave him the air, or His old friends gave him the brush off, or Mary cried and cried when he gave her the gate, or The company gave him the old heave-ho after only a month. In the first expression, which dates from about 1920, giving air presumably alludes to being blown out. The second, from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to brushing away dust or lint. The third, from about 1900, uses gate in the sense of "an exit." The fourth alludes to the act of heaving a person out, and is sometimes used to mean "to fire someone from a job" (see get the ax). All these are colloquialisms, and all have variations using get, get the air (etc.), meaning "to be snubbed or told to leave," as in After he got the brush off, he didn't know what to do.
See also: air, give, someone

heave-ho, give the

See also: give

heave into sight

Rise or seem to rise into view. For example, We waited and waited, and finally the rest of our party heaved into sight. This expression was at first used for ships rising over the horizon. [Late 1700s]
See also: heave, sight

give something/someone the heave-ho

or

give something/someone the old heave-ho

INFORMAL
If you give something or someone the heave-ho or the old heave-ho, you get rid of them. The band members decided to give their drummer the heave-ho. Harry gave his girlfriend the old heave-ho and moved in with the Texan. Note: You can also say that someone or something gets the heave-ho or gets the old heave-ho. There was a 40 per cent drop in film production, with a lot of high profile projects getting the heave-ho.
See also: give, someone, something

heave in sight (or into view)

come into view. informal
Heave meaning ‘rise up, as on the swell of a wave’ occurs in several nautical expressions; here the allusion is to the way that objects appear to rise up over the horizon at sea. The past form of heave in this sense is hove , but because most English-speakers are completely unfamiliar with the verb in its literal usage, hove is often used as a present form (and a new past form, hoved , is created from it).
See also: heave, sight

give (or get) the heave-ho

expel (or be expelled) from an institution, association, or contest. informal
See also: give

give somebody the (old) heave-ˈho

(informal) dismiss somebody from their job; end a relationship with somebody: ‘Are Julie and Mike still together?’ ‘Oh no, she gave him the old heave-ho a couple of months ago.’ Heave-ho was originally the cry of sailors when pulling up the anchor.
See also: give, somebody

heave to

v.
To steer a sailing ship directly into the wind so that it stops sailing, especially in order to face a storm or to make repairs: We hove to so that we could change the torn sail.
See also: heave

heave up

v.
1. To raise or lift something up, especially with great effort or force: The campers heaved up the flag. The tow truck heaved our car up.
2. To vomit: I heaved up my dinner. The turbulent waves caused the people on the ship to heave their lunch up.
See also: heave, up

get the ax

verb
See also: ax, get

heave

(hiv)
in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. He heaved and heaved and sounded like he was dying.

old heave-ho

(ˈold ˈhivˈho)
n. a dismissal; a physical removal of someone from a place. I thought my job was secure, but today I got the old heave-ho.
See also: old

heave into

sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.
See also: heave
References in periodicals archive ?
A serving member of the SAS who had served in Northern Ireland, he gave evidence in secret against Heaver during a dramatic trial at Liverpool Crown Court.
Ahmed lashed out after Mr Heaver parked up and went to find a trolley.
Ed Beltrami, prosecuting, said Heaver was 18 when he was reported missing.
Heaver said: 'We are delighted that Greg and Billy will be riding together again and that Nigel Wagstaff has agreed to a full transfer.
Mr Heaver revealed the location was away from residential areas and neighboured a farm which produces meat.
After he got out of jail Heaver changed his name to Mark Ayres and founded a company that was paid by the government to deport illegal immigrants.
Last month Lorraine Shettle, of Oliver Lane, Marsden, Dennis Johnson, of Nabcroft Lane, Crosland Moor and Robert Sykes and Suzzanne Heaver, of Hawthorne Terrace, Crosland Moor, were all prosecuted by Kirklees Council for the same reason.
The Brandon club possess almost an embarrassment of riches in terms of world-class assets, and co-promoter Jeremy Heaver has now taken a swipe at the attitude of Oxford boss Nigel Wagstaff over the projected transfers of Greg Hancock and Billy Hamill to Cowley.
Co-promoters Colin Pratt and Jeremy Heaver are due to meet representatives from Elite League rivals Ipswich and Oxford.
COVENTRY Stadium Operations Manager Jeremy Heaver says Brandon will close at the end of the next season.
Security boss Mark Heaver was later convicted of organising the murder to take control of Michael's boxing prodigy Louis Cuddy.
Retailers have woken up to the fact that they have to get tough when it comes to making sure employees are checking IDs," said Ed Heaver, director of Serve Legal.
Robert Sykes and Suzzanne Heaver, of Hawthorne Terrace, Crosland Moor, were fined pounds 200 each, with pounds 588 clearance and legal costs.
More than 5000 home fans braved the torrential downpour to watch Roberto Donadoni put his superstars through their paces on a pitch that could not have been heaver had it been made of the local polenta.