get the ax

(redirected from heave-ho)
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get the axe

1. To be fired. I'm going to get the ax if the boss finds out that printing error was my fault.
2. To be ended or stopped abruptly. I'm so disappointed that my favorite show got the axe this year.
See also: axe, get

get the ax

Also, get the boot or bounce or can or heave-ho or hook or sack . Be discharged or fired, expelled, or rejected. For example, He got the ax at the end of the first week, or The manager was stunned when he got the boot himself, or We got the bounce in the first quarter, or The pitcher got the hook after one inning, or Bill finally gave his brother-in-law the sack. All but the last of these slangy expressions date from the 1870s and 1880s. They all have variations using give that mean "to fire or expel someone," as in Are they giving Ruth the ax?Get the ax alludes to the executioner's ax, and get the boot to literally booting or kicking someone out. Get the bounce alludes to being bounced out; get the can comes from the verb can, "to dismiss," perhaps alluding to being sealed in a container; get the heave-ho alludes to heave in the sense of lifting someone bodily, and get the hook is an allusion to a fishing hook. Get the sack, first recorded in 1825, probably came from French though it existed in Middle Dutch. The reference here is to a workman's sac ("bag") in which he carried his tools and which was given back to him when he was fired. Also see give someone the air.
See also: ax, get

get the axe

or

get the chop

1. If someone gets the axe or gets the chop, they lose their job. Note: `Axe' is spelled `ax' in American English. Business managers, executives and technical staff are all getting the axe. I've often wondered whether I'd have got the chop, if I'd stayed long enough to find out. Note: You can also say that someone is given the axe or is given the chop. She was last night given the axe from the hit TV show.
2. If something such as a project or part of a business gets the axe or gets the chop, it is ended suddenly. Note: `Axe' is spelled `ax' in American English. That is one of the TV shows likely to get the axe. Services to major towns and cities across England are getting the chop or being reduced. Note: You can also say that something is given the axe or is given the chop. A few days previously, the Westoe Colliery, the last pit in the region, was given the axe.
See also: axe, get

get the ax

verb
See also: ax, get
References in periodicals archive ?
shocking to Cheryl gave her husband heave-ho, out above her exercise sort of wouldn't a good I'd want it of performing liposuction.
I bet they'll dry up when he gets the old heave-ho.
NEWCASTLE'S Lego Men sculpture is finally getting the heave-ho.
Even if a token one or two do get the heave-ho, consider this.
IT would be ironic if former rugby star Kenny Logan were to get the old heave-ho on World Cup weekend but the bookies reckon he's the most likely candidate for the chop in Strictly Come Dancing's third elimination today and tomorrow, writes Jeremy Chapman.
Cigarette butts are being given the heave-ho after a new campaign to keep them off the streets was launched today.
After you've given the toxic products the heave-ho, you'll discover that greener cleaning products are now widely available.
Young Oliver found the pool the perfect place to give the whale painted on his face the heave-ho.
So we asked him to evaluate the remaining nine, right after Jessica Sierra got the heave-ho last week.
But Sir Jimmy Savile, former MP Edwina Currie and whining popstar Natalie Appleton, who failed miserably in ITV1's I'm A Celebrity, have all been given the heave-ho.
If giving your own phone the heave-ho won't cure your frustrations, how about bothering your bothersome bystanders?
It even makes you think that the party is being bedevilled by a death wish or that its leader Iain Duncan Smith is deliberately acting clueless because he wants to get the heave-ho.
The deal, agreed to just over a year ago, has been dying a slow death since regulators gave it the heave-ho earlier this fall.
The United States Sailing Association (US Sailing) has given the heave-ho to the US Sailing prescription to racing rule 64.
The New York Times gave its stand- alone "A Nation Challenged" section the old heave-ho New Year's Eve.