head for


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Related to head for: turned up

head for someone or something

to aim for or move toward someone or something. She waved good-bye as she headed for the door. Ann came in and headed for her mother.
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head for

Proceed or go in a certain direction, as in I'm heading for town, or I believe Karen and Jane are heading for a big quarrel. This expression, which uses head in the sense of "advance toward," is occasionally amplified with a figurative destination, especially in the American West. For example, head for the hills means "to run away to high and safer ground" or "to flee from danger." It is often used facetiously, as in Here comes that old bore-head for the hills!Head for the setting sun alludes to where a wanted man or outlaw went when a law-enforcement agent was close behind him, that is, farther west, and head for the last roundup means "to die." [Early 1800s]
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head for

v.
1. To travel toward some destination: We headed for Houston.
2. To set something or someone on a course toward some destination, situation or condition. Used passively: This bus is headed for New York. You're headed for trouble if you keep telling such lies.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These filings disclosed, for the first time, the compensation being paid to ESG Chairman John Head for acting as the company's Chief Executive Officer.
The combination of DOCS Open, DOCS Imaging (developed by Diamond Head for PC DOCS using its ImageBASIC development environment) and Tempest not only is a direct competitor to FileNET's Panagon IDM Services and Panagon Document Services, it offers functionality not available from FileNET now or in the foreseeable future.
After IBM introduced the industry's first MR head for disk-drive products in 1991, the annual increase in areal density (the number of bits stored in a given area of disk surface) doubled from 30 percent to a staggering 60 percent a year.