have (some/any) qualms about (something or someone)

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have (some/any) qualms about (something or someone)

To have some or certain hesitations, apprehensions, uneasiness, or pangs of conscience (about something or someone). (Also often used in the negative to mean the opposite.) I know it's wrong to feel this way, but I don't have any qualms about telling my boss I'm sick if it means I can have a long weekend. I thought his promotion was a done deal, but it turns out the board of directors has some qualms about Jonathan. Before we start, do you have any qualms about the plan we discussed?
See also: have, qualm
References in periodicals archive ?
Hass, however, said he resigned himself to the compromise, as did university administrators who were having qualms.
Witness the extent to which countries which have long shouted from the rooftops about human rights have suddenly tried to pass laws allowing them to keep people in detention without trial for 90 days, or imprison them in a no-man's land of a foreign camp and call the prisoners enemy combatants, or censured and jailed journalists for printing inconvenient truths, or stopped having qualms about collecting personal information if this invasion of privacy enables them to collect information that might help them fight the T word.
Despite many having qualms over unnecessary animal testing ( particularly for cosmetics ( there was unanimous support for laboratory tests for the benefit of medical developments.
If you're having qualms about side-lining your husband permanently, force yourself to look at - and think about - the positives instead.
However, there is a service out there that could help if you are having qualms about showing off your creative skills to your friends and family.
Far from having qualms about working together, they relished the chance to be on the same film at the same time, so busy and disparate have their working schedules become over the past few years.
LAUSD's top lawyer acknowledged in an interview having qualms about cutting major deals without competitive bidding, but Superintendent Roy Romer defended the deal during an open school board meeting Tuesday.