have

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Related to haves: halves

have

(someone) by the balls Vulgar Slang
To have control over someone; have someone at one's mercy.

have

/take the bit in one's teeth
To be uncontrollable; cast off restraint.

have

/keep an ear to the ground
To be on the watch for new trends or information.

have

/keep (one's) fingers crossed
To hope for a successful or advantageous outcome.

have

/keep (one's) nose to the grindstone
To work hard and steadily.

have

/have got it all over
To be much better than (someone) at a particular endeavor.

have

/have got it in for
To act in a hostile manner toward or intend to harm (someone), especially because of a grudge.

have

/have got it in (one)
To have the capacity or disposition to (to do something).

have

/have got nothing on (someone)
1. To fail to be equal or superior to (someone) in a particular way.
2. To know or be able to prove information regarding (someone).

have

/have got (someone's) back
To protect or shield someone from harm, loss, or danger.

have

/take pity on
To show compassion for.

have

/speak with a forked tongue
To speak deceitfully; prevaricate or lie.

have

/keep (one's) wits about (one)
To remain alert or calm, especially in a crisis.

have

/take a whack at Informal
To try out; attempt.
See:
References in classic literature ?
The first to captivate and take his fancy were the pots, out of which he would have very gladly helped himself to a moderate pipkinful; then the wine skins secured his affections; and lastly, the produce of the frying-pans, if, indeed, such imposing cauldrons may be called frying-pans; and unable to control himself or bear it any longer, he approached one of the busy cooks and civilly but hungrily begged permission to soak a scrap of bread in one of the pots; to which the cook made answer, "Brother, this is not a day on which hunger is to have any sway, thanks to the rich Camacho; get down and look about for a ladle and skim off a hen or two, and much good may they do you.
Hearing this, Don Quixote said to himself, "It is easy to see these folk have never seen my Dulcinea del Toboso; for if they had they would be more moderate in their praises of this Quiteria of theirs.
At their head were a venerable old man and an ancient dame, more brisk and active, however, than might have been expected from their years.
I know not fear, I have my will, Whate'er my whim or fancy be; For me there's no impossible, I order, bind, forbid, set free.
In the same manner all the characters of the two bands advanced and retired, and each executed its figures, and delivered its verses, some of them graceful, some burlesque, but Don Quixote's memory (though he had an excellent one) only carried away those that have been just quoted.
Of course I have finished it," replied Sancho, "because I see your worship takes offence at it; but if it was not for that, there was work enough cut out for three days.
In good faith, senor," replied Sancho, "there's no trusting that fleshless one, I mean Death, who devours the lamb as soon as the sheep, and, as I have heard our curate say, treads with equal foot upon the lofty towers of kings and the lowly huts of the poor.
It may have been my fancy, or it may have had something to do with my hammering at the gates of bronze.
In some of these visions of Utopias and coming times which I have read, there is a vast amount of detail about building, and social arrangements, and so forth.
The creature's friendliness affected me exactly as a child's might have done.
It must have been the night before her rescue that I was awakened about dawn.
I was feeling that chill, uncertain, early-morning feeling you may have known.
They must have been ghosts," I said; "I wonder whence they dated.